1000 Books Before Kindergarten

Getting Started

The goal of 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten is to read 1,000 books with your child before starting school. Can you do it? If you read just one book each day, that is 365 books a year. You can reread your favorite books as much as you want. Just keep track of how many books you read, and you will see them adding up fast. If you attend library storytimes, you can count those books, too.

To register your child, visit our Reading Challenges page by clicking the link above. Log your books online using the Beanstack app (Apple | Android) or print a reading log.

Get 4 Free Books!

In addition to the intrinsic rewards of reading together, your child can get a sticker from the librarian’s desk each time you read another 100 books. Please take a photo of your child on our 1000 Books wall. After completing 200, 500, 700, and 1000 books, your child will get to choose a free book to keep.

More Information

Numerous studies estimate that as many as one in five children have difficulties learning to read. Reading aloud with your baby or young child will establish strong early literacy skills – the skills they will use later when they enter school and begin learning to read. A bonus is that reading time is bonding time – it strengthens your relationship with your child and stimulates brain growth. Read more facts and tips on Early Literacy: Creating a Book Lover from Jennifer, Children’s Services Librarian.

Grant

This program promotes reading to children, encourages families to use the library, and supports the development of early literacy skills to give children the best chance at academic success. The program is made possible through a K-LINK Grant from USD 383 and additional funding from the Manhattan Library Association.

Questions?

Call us at (785) 776-4741 ext. 400, or .

A toddler's brain creates up to two million new connections every second.
A toddler's brain creates up to two million new connections every second.
A child's brain develops most rapidly before the age of three.
A child's brain develops most rapidly before the age of three.
Sharing books and stories is important to your child's brain development.
Sharing books and stories is important to your child's brain development.
Children who are read to at an early age are more successful in school.
Children who are read to at an early age are more successful in school.
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