Posts Tagged Manhattan

SHAKESPEARE FAIRE AT MANHATTAN PUBLIC LIBRARY

Susan Withee, Adult Services Manager

 

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Manhattan and KSU are in the throes of a full-out Shakespeare First Folio frenzy this month!  Joining in that spirit, Manhattan Public Library invites you to share the genius, joy, and fun of Shakespeare with us at three different events – a Shakespeare Faire here at the library on Saturday, February 20, with programs for all ages; a series of four modern film adaptations of Shakespeare plays on Saturday afternoons from February into March; and a casual evening Shakespeare Reading Party (with delicious hors d’oeuvres) on Thursday, March 3, at 6:30 p.m. at the Little Apple Brewing Company.

To kick it all off, join us for a Shakespeare Faire for all ages on February 20 from 10:00-3:00 p.m.  The day’s programs will include a workshop for kids, insightful and informative talks, live music, Renaissance instruments, open mic poetry and readings, experimental theatre, and a critically acclaimed film.  You’re welcome to come for a single program, come for all, or choose from the buffet.

Here’s the program line-up for the Shakespeare Faire:           

10:00 a.m., auditorium:  “Shakespeare Workshop for Kids.” Recommended for age 6-14, but all are welcome.  Warm up by shouting some pithy Shakespearean insults (“You beetle-headed, flap-eared knave!”).  Then discover more about Shakespeare’s world and Elizabethan England, play a trivia game, and explore the language of the time through word play.  Presenter: Melissa Poll, KSU College of Music, Theater, and Dance.

11:00 a.m., Groesbeck Room:  “Tinkering with Shakespeare’s Text” presented by Michael Donnelly, with an afterword from Don Hedrick, both faculty members in the KSU English Department.

11:30 a.m., auditorium:  KSU Collegium Musicum presents a Renaissance Instrument Petting Zoo.  If you’ve ever been curious about sackbuts, viols, cornetti, crumhorns, frame drums, and lutes, here is your chance.  Some instruments are to see and some are to try.  There will also be examples of turn-of-the-17th-century printed music.

12:00 noon, auditorium:  KSU Collegium Musicum directed by David Wood offers a program of Renaissance vocal music and recorders that is sure to be a delight.

12:30 p.m., Groesbeck Room:  Speed Scholars from the KSU English Department present short, TED-style talks on a variety of Shakespeare-related topics.  Presenters include Kara Northway, Wendy Matlock, Tosha Sampson-Choma, and Joe Sutliff Sanders, and their topics include the history of the First Folio, the literary roots of Shakespeare’s plays, Shakespearean characters reimagined, and the modern uses of Shakespeare in comic book format.

1:00 p.m., main atrium:  “Sonnets & Soliloquies: Open Mic” will be your chance to step up to the microphone and declaim from the library’s atrium balcony.  Join KSU students at the open mic as they and you read favorite passages from Shakespeare’s drama and poetry.  Selections for you to choose from will be available at the event, or bring your own script!

2:00 p.m., auditorium:  “Experimenting with Shakespeare:  Short Plays Inspired by Hamlet” presented by the students of the Manhattan Experimental Theater Workshop led by Jim Hamilton and Gwethalyn Williams.

Also on Saturday, February 20, from 3:00-5:00 in the auditorium we’ll show the first in a series of four modern film adaptations of Shakespeare plays. This first film is a 2012 black-and-white contemporary reinterpretation of one of Shakespeare’s most famous comedies.  Filled with scheming, mistaken identity, betrayal, and a contentious romance, the film showcases the human tendency to create a lot of fuss, bother, and drama about …, well, nothing!  Rated PG-13, this film is more suited to older teens and adults.

comedyJoin us at the Little Apple Brewing Company on Thursday, March 3, at 6:30 p.m. for a casual evening Shakespeare Reading Party, accompanied by generous hors d’oeuvres courtesy of the Manhattan Library Association.  Drinks and dinner available at your own expense.  We’ll take turns reading our way through Shakespeare’s shortest play and one of his most farcical comedies, “The Comedy of Errors,” with plenty of time-outs for conversation, food, and beverages. The play centers around two sets of identical twins separated at birth and is full of mistaken identities, slapstick humor, confusion, wordplay, and puns.  Copies of the play are available for free download to your e-reader device from Project Gutenberg and are available for purchase from amazon.com for $4.95 (the Signet Classic paperback edition).  A few paperback copies will be available at the event for those who decide to drop in and enjoy the fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Books Galore at the Library’s Annual Book Sale 2016

2016 book sale Manhattan Library Association

The Manhattan Library Association’s (MLA) Annual Book Sale will be held the last weekend in February in the auditorium of the Manhattan Public Library, located at 629 Poyntz Avenue.  A special preview night is open to MLA Members on Friday, February 26 from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.  Memberships will be sold at the door starting at $10 for an individual, and $15 for families.

The library’s book sale will be open to the public on Saturday, February 27 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the library’s auditorium. Shoppers find delicious treats to keep their energy up at the Teen Bake Sale starting at 10:00 a.m. in the atrium.

On Sunday, February 28, from 1:00 – 3:30 p.m. shoppers will find special deals on the remaining materials.

Bargains abound at this annual sale. All of the money raised will be used to fund library programs and purchases such as new books and furniture, special events for children, and summer reading programs.  In 2015, $10,400 was raised to support the library.

This is truly a community event, staffed by wonderful volunteers like Roger Brannan, Doug Schoning, Elaine Shannon, Wilma Schmeller, and Carol Oukrop, who devote countless hours of work to organize the sale. Helpers from JobCorps, Rotarct, and the Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity make the heavy-lifting much easier, and community supporters like Dara’s and Community First National Bank help get the word out.

For more information about the book sale, or if you would like to volunteer to help, visit the Manhattan Public Library at 629 Poyntz Avenue, email us at refstaff@mhklibrary.org  or call (785) 776-4741.

shoppers at the 2014 MLA book sale

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Delve into the Rich History of the Manhattan Area!

by Linda Henderson, Adult Services Librarian

In 1855, the Hartford, the first little steamboat built specially to travel the Kansas River, beached on a sandbar near the mouth of the Little Blue River.   Little could these new visitors to Kansas imagine their legacy: a rich history of people and unique accomplishments!   First named “New Boston,” “Manhattan” was established after a compromise between two major settling companies.  The Riley County Historical Society, the Riley County Genealogical Society, and Manhattan Public Library maintain reams of history for anyone interested in knowing more about how our city came to be.

Manhattan Public Library makes a point of preserving books about local history.  Winifred Slagg’s Riley County Kansas vividly portrays the early settlers of Riley County.  A local author, Lowell Jack, in his History of Manhattan, Kansas, Riley County and Ft. Riley, offers an excellent timeline starting in 1850.  He recounts personal stories of founders, like Mrs. E.B. Purcell, who persuaded Andrew Carnegie to contribute $10,000 to establish our first library, and Ella Child, women’s suffragist daughter of Seth Child, accompanying her parents to the polls so that they could all vote. Neighbors of the Past, also by Jack, recounts personal histories of interesting historic Manhattanites.

Another local author, Geraldine Baker Walton, wrote 140 Years of Soul: a History of African Americans in Manhattan, Kansas 1865-2005 An excellent review of Manhattan’s local architecture awaits in The Architects & Buildings of Manhattan, Kansas by Dr. Patricia J. O’Brien.  The public library also has many calendars and books full of historical photographs.  Or, on the fantastic side, Ghosts of Fort Riley shares stories and photos about legendary ghosts said to haunt Ft. Riley. The Official State Atlas of Kansas, published in 1887, holds a historic Manhattan city and Riley county map, along with many other Kansas locations, with drawings of many Kansas business buildings and farmsteads.  And, the Manhattan city directories list people and businesses from the 1950s until today.

Google does not know everything yet!  Manhattan Public Library maintains a huge collection of newspapers and local publications on microfilm. The earliest is from 1859 entitled: The Manhattan Express.  Other titles include The Kansas Radical from 1866, The Leonardville Monitor from 1884 on, and the Riley County Chronicle from 1889.  The Seaton family bought the Mercury newspaper in 1915,  and after several title reincarnations, the Seatons adopted the title:  Manhattan Mercury in 1954. Whatever its title, we archive the Mercury from then to now on microfilm – and of course, we keep the paper copies for three months, too!

The microfilm collection provides a wealth of history for Manhattan, Leonardville, Randolph, and the Riley County area.  Thanks to Sy Ekart, who has volunteered hundreds of hours over several years, manually inspecting decades of aging newsprint, we have indexes covering newspapers from the 1850s through the 1940s. Sy is continuing to index more newspapers on microfilm today. The indexes  note obituaries and many other articles in local newspapers.   Accidents, business openings and closings, elections, and so much more; if it happened here, Sy indexed who did what.

Beyond recounting the specifics of Manhattan, older newspapers can entertain!  It is sometimes startling and just plain funny to look at the past.    Familiar and strange things for sale for mere cents, political commentary that could almost have come from today’s op-eds, interesting personal notices – both more and less has changed than we tend to think!  Even browsing your local newspaper from when you graduated from high school can bring back many memories – the news of the time; what bands were playing; the best places to eat and relax.

Manhattan Public Library holds these wonderful indexes in the reference area on 2nd floor, and they are also available at the Riley County Genealogical Society.  Manhattan Public Library’s new microfilm readers let patrons e-mail, print, or save any of these materials for later reading or sharing.  We will be happy to request other Kansas newspapers on microfilm from the Kansas Historical Society at no charge.

Our local history cabinet holds articles and pictures about all sorts of things: local floods, from the massive pre-Manhattan Kansas River flood of 1844 to the floods of 1903, 1951, and 1993; the Tuttle Creek Dam controversy; local biographies; city maps from various times; articles on Kansas City’s George Giles, of the African American Monarchs; writings from anti-slavery settlers; the origins of Manhattan street names; stories about the Old Military Trail, and hundreds of other bits of local history.

Our popular “Tech Tuesdays” classes are starting this Tuesday, January 12 at 2:00 p.m. with “Download E-books and Audiobooks. The following Tuesday, January 19th, also at 2:00, p.m., the session will be on Smartphone Help.  Feel free to call Manhattan Public Library at 785-776-4741, ext. 300 for more information.

Photos courtesy of the Riley County Historical Society

 

 

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Monarchs Baseball History at MPL

by Janet, Adult Services Librarian

14541-illustration-of-a-baseball-pvMost people have heard of Jackie Robinson, some have heard of Satchel Paige and many have heard of the Kansas City Monarchs – but few know how connected they were to the Manhattan community. In honor of the 90th Anniversary of the Monarchs’ first World Championship in 1924, author Phil S. Dixon will be speaking in cities where they played to present the team’s unique history as well as discuss the history of African-American ball players from our community who participated in the Negro Leagues. Help us and our co-sponsor, the Riley County Historical Society, welcome Mr. Dixon to the Manhattan Public Library on Sunday, March 29, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. For more than thirty years Mr. Dixon has recorded African-American sports topics with a vast array of in-depth skill and historical accuracy. He is widely regarded for his expertise on baseball history. He has authored nine prior baseball books and won the prestigious Casey Award for the Best Baseball Book of 1992. Join us for this fascinating program about Manhattan and Baseball history!

monarchs

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Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in Manhattan

shamrocksWhat began as a feast day to celebrate the patron saint of Ireland, St. Patrick’s Day has grown and spread around the world as a day to celebrate all things Irish.

Manhattan offers a fun and family-friendly environment for celebrating the wearing of the green:

Blarney Breakfast on Saturday, March 14 from 7:30 to 11:30am

Rise and shine early to enjoy the Blarney Breakfast, a fundraiser for the Manhattan Arts Center held at Kite’s Grille and Bar in Aggieville. Enjoy some green eggs, biscuits and gravy from 7:30 to 11:30am. Tickets are available through the Manhattan Arts Center.

 

StPatsRoadRace_LOGOThe Shamrock Fun Run and 2-mile walk, March 14  at 10:00am &

St. Pat’s 10K Road Race, March 14 at 10:45am

Register is required for both races—there is a registration fee. Race awards will be presented at 12:15 in Triangle Park.

 

St. Patrick’s Day Parade

The parade begins in City Park at 2:00pm and goes through Aggieville.

 

Indoor Activities

If running or being outdoors isn’t your cup o’ tea (or if it’s raining or snowing!) and you’re looking for fun things to do indoors in Manhattan,  there will be a Nature Storytime for children in the library’s storytime room at 10:00 a.m. At 2:00 kids can visit the library for a free movie showing. The movie tells the story of a squirrel who is exiled from his park home, but finds himself helping his former friends raid a nut shop to survive. It turns out the nut store is also the front for a human gang’s bank robbery. Rated PG; 85 minutes.

The Flint Hills Discovery Center has two exhibits to explore:  “Save the Last Dance” illustrates the ecology and “dance” of the North American Grassland Grouse”, and “K is for Kansas: Exploring Kansas A to Z” illustrates fun facts about Kansas. Admission is charged.

Several free exhibits are available for viewing at the Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art at KSU. Wander the museum to see “Chet Peters: Life Forms”, “Stan Herd: Cairns on the Beach” and “Dan Mitchell: A Place, a Mental Space.”

No matter our ethnic origins, we are all honorary Irish on St, Patrick’s Day, so wear your green and have a safe and fun celebration!

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March Events at the Library Include Baseball and Charles Dickens

by Susan Withee, Adult Services Manager 

What do Internet safety, the Kansas City Monarchs, Manhattan history, Charles Dickens, and great books for sale all have in common? They’re all at Manhattan Public Library in the month of March.

Last weekend, the Manhattan Library Association (the Friends of the Library) annual book sale was a huge success, in spite of the snow, and the effort raised thousands of dollars to support summer reading and other library programs for all ages. The tremendous generosity and support of our Friends and the tireless year-round efforts of book sale volunteers are truly appreciated. Thanks, also, to all those in the community who donate so many wonderful books each year for our library sale. It’s a gift that benefits us all.  If you didn’t get a chance to stop by and browse the thousands of books for sale, don’t worry! You can find great deals on gently used books all year long at Rosie’s Corner Book Store on the first floor of the library.

Mark your calen20monarchsdar for Sunday, March 29, for a fun and informative program that’s sure to appeal to fans of baseball, local history, and African-American history. Author and historian Phil Dixon, a co-founder of the Negro Leagues Museum in Kansas City, will present “The Kansas City Monarchs and Our Home Town,” a program about the Monarchs’ unique history, with special emphasis on their connections to Manhattan and on the history of Negro Leagues Baseball. Mr. Dixon has authored nine books and will offer his books at the program for sale and signing. Join us at 2:00 p.m. in the Library Auditorium. This program is appropriate for all ages and is co-sponsored by the Riley County Historical Society.

Join us for tea, cookies, and Brit Lit on Thursday, March 26th, 7:00 p.m., when our monthly book series will continue with a discussion of Charles Dickens’ “Great Expectations.” We’ll meet in the Groesbeck Room and our discussion leader this month will be KSU Professor Michaeline Chance-Reay. “Great Expectations” is the story of orphaned Pip, his desperate early years, his struggles to overcome his past, and his dreams of becoming a gentleman. Drawing on the his frequent themes of Victorian wealth and poverty, love and rejection, weakness or strength of character, and the eventual triumph of good over evil, Dickens weaves multiple storylines into a tight plot, imagining scenes rich in comedy and pathos and introducing a succession of unforgettable characters. This TALK series of programs is sponsored by the Kansas Humanities Council and the Manhattan Library Association.

book discussionThe Tech Tuesday series at Manhattan Public Library continues in March with two different technology programs. On Tuesday, March 10th, at 2:00 p.m., members of the Riley County Genealogical Society will lead a workshop on “Intermediate Ancestry and Kansas Resources,” a look at more advanced techniques for using the online resource Ancestry.com and at unique genealogy resources for the state of Kansas.

Our second March workshop will discuss privacy and security in the digital world of the 21st century. On Tuesday, March 24, at 7:00 p.m.,  we will feature “Online Privacy and Security,” led by Lucas Loughmiller, Director of Library Services at USD 383, who will focus on ways in which adults can get the most out of the online world while maximizing the safety and security of their own personal information. Tech Tuesday programs are held in the library’s Groesbeck Room. You can register for Tech Tuesdays on the library’s website at www.mhklibrary.org or by calling us at 785-776-4741 Ext. 141.

Hope to see you in the library this month!

 

 

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Yearbooks, Anyone?

Blue MManhattan Public Library has a collection of Blue M and Royal Purple yearbooks in our Reference Collection. However, we are missing several years and hope that there are patrons in Manhattan who have some yearbooks to donate to our collection! We are in need of Blue M Yearbooks from 1930, 1931, 1932, 1941, 1943, 1970, 1977 and 1979.

We would also like to expand our collection and are interested in yearbooks from Luckey High School.

If you are interested in donating any of these yearbooks to complete our collection, please call 776-4741  extension 141 or drop off Yearbooks at the Information Desk. Thanks!!

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Souper Bowl Soups are Needed

by Mary, Adult Services Librarian

sundayDo you have any extra cans of soup in your pantry to share?  This weekend is the almighty Super Bowl, and Bill Kennedy has been coordinating and promoting it as Souper Bowl Sunday for a number of years.  “Long after a day when most of us celebrate with food and drink and relaxation, hunger will remain…   From 9a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, January 31, volunteers will be collecting canned food at each of Manhattan’s grocery stores.  Also every church and organization in the area can likewise collect food for hungry people.”

We all can enjoy thinking about the warmth soup can bring to us in the winter. In fact February 4th is National Homemade Soup Day.

 

Why not try Grammy’s Broccoli Soup from the food.com website.

1 bunch broccoli, cut up

1/2 cup diced celery

1/2 cup diced carrot

1 quart water

2 -4 chicken bouillon cubes

3 tablespoons butter

1/2 cup chopped onion

1/4 cup cornstarch

1/4 cup flour

1 quart milk (2% or whole is best)

4 ounces shredded cheddar cheese

Directions:

1.Combine broccoli, celery, carrots, water, and chicken bouillon in a large soup pot. Boil 20-30 minutes.

2.While vegetables are cooking – In a saucepan, saute onion in butter until tender.

3.Add cornstarch and flour to butter mixture, stirring until browned.

4.Gradually add milk and cook, stirring constantly, until thick. Add shredded cheese and stir until melted.

5.Add the cheese sauce to the broccoli mixture and stir until well combined. Simmer until heated through.

Try a new soup from one of our many cookbooks that focus on hearty goodness in a bowl.

300 soups300 Sensational Soups by Carla Snyder

Sunday Soup: A Year’s Worth of Mouthwatering Easy to Make Recipes by Betty Rosbottom

Soup Night: Recipes for Creating Community Around a Pot of Soup by Maggie Stuckey

 

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Martin Luther King, Jr. 2015 Art and Writing Contest

by Keri Mills, Young Adult Librarian

MLK

Manhattan Public Library (MPL) hosted and sponsored the 2015 Martin Luther King, Jr. Art and Writing Contest, which has been an important part of MLK Day events for over 15 years. The theme for this year’s contest was “Only Love Can Drive Out Hate,” which was taken from one of Dr. King’s most famous quotes: “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” This year’s entries acknowledged the importance that each individual can play, no matter how young or old he or she may be, in promoting Dr. King’s message of nonviolence. They also understand the importance of Dr. King’s place in the world that still resonates throughout our society today. There was participation from kids of all ages, as well as adults in this year’s contest. We had entries from almost all of the area elementary schools, Eisenhower and Anthony middle schools, Manhattan High School, Manhattan Catholic Schools, Flint Hills Christian School, Riley County schools, Kansas State University, and homeschool students.

Submissions for the contest were accepted beginning in December through January 11th, with the judging taking place on January 12th. All entries were judged based on five criteria: originality, creativity, artistic quality or writing style, content, and relevance to the theme. Winners were chosen by a panel of volunteer judges from the community. A thanks goes out to this year’s judges for volunteering their time and effort! Writing Judges included: Beth Bailey from the Union Program Council at Kansas State University; Carol Russell, English Professor at Kansas State University; and Deborah Murray, English professor at Kansas State University. Art judges included: Marrin Robinson, art instructor at Kansas State University; and Karen Schmidt, retired USD 383 middle school art teacher.

Besides Manhattan Public Library, this year’s sponsors included the Gallery for Peace and Justice, Manhattan Library Association, and Manhattan Town Center. Best of show winners received $50 gift certificates from Varney’s or Claflin Books and Copies and $20 gift cards from Manhattan Town Center. First place winners from each of the five age categories received a $25 gift certificate from Varney’s or Claflin Books and Copies. All winners received a certificate of recognition from the MLK Art & Writing Contest Committee.

Award winners were recognized at the annual awards ceremony which took place during the community MLK celebration at Manhattan Town Center on Monday, January 19. Manhattan Mayor Wynn Butler presented the winners with their awards at the recognition ceremony. Here are the 2015 contest winners:

ART

Best of Show: Usha Reddi’s first grade class from Ogden Elementary

 First Place

K-2nd Grade: Ritodeep Roy, Lee Elementary

3rd-5th Grade: Micah Craine, Bluemont Elementary

6th-8th Grade: Kaden Vandorn, Flint Hills Christian School

Adult:  Paulicia Williams

 Honorable Mention

K-2nd Grade: Justin Orvis, Manhattan Catholic Schools

3rd-5th Grade: Sahana Datta and Ananya Pagadala, Marlatt and Amanda Arnold Elementary Schools

6th-8th Grade: Ann Hess, Flint Hills Christian School

9th-12th Grade: Ames Burton, Riley County Schools

 WRITING

Best of Show: Chase Rauch, Manhattan Catholic Schools

First Place

3rd-5th Grade: Halle Gaul, Frank V. Bergman Elementary

6th-8th Grade: Blaise Hayden, Manhattan Catholic Schools

9th-12th Grade: Elijah Irving,  Flint Hills Christian School

Adult: Randy Jellison

 Honorable Mention

3rd-5th Grade: Hannah Loub, Frank V. Bergman Elementary

6th-8th Grade: Abby Cronander, Manhattan Catholic Schools

9th-12th Grade: Amanda Dillon, Flint Hills Christian School

9th-12th Grade: Caleb Linville, Flint Hills Christian School

 

Congratulations to all of our winners, and thank you to all of the individuals and groups who participated in the contest. The winning entries will be on display at MPL in the atrium through the end of February. Be sure to stop by and take a look!

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Thanks for your generosity!

mittens_christmas_winter-512Our holiday decorations have been taken down and we are ready at Manhattan Public library for a new year! We want to thank our patrons and RSVP for their generosity in adding items to our annual Mitten Tree. We were able to deliver over 275 new and handmade items to College Hill Preschool, Riley County Head Start and Ogden Friendship House. These beautiful hats, gloves, mittens and scarves will warm lots of hands, heads and hearts during this cold winter. Thank you!

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