News & More...

Posts Tagged library programs

Thursday’s Book Discussion!

index3ALTS5PAThursday at 7:00 pm in the Grosebeck Room at Manhattan Public Library will be our final event in our Big Read programs regarding the book “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien. We are especially excited to have Dr. Kim Stanley, a professor at McPherson College and a representative of the Kansas Humanities Council, here in Manhattan to lead our discussion. Dr. Stanley is very knowledgeable about this book and promises to provide an informative and lively discussion. Refreshments will be served. Join us for this interesting discussion!

Posted in: Adult Services, For Adults

Leave a Comment (0) →

Celebrate “Kansas Reads to Preschoolers Week”

By Laura Ransom, Children’s Librarian

“Kansas Reads to Preschoolers Week” is an annual event that promotes reading to all Kansas children from birth through age five. Parents, librarians, and caregivers are encouraged to read the chosen book during the week of November 16-22.

funI am especially excited about this year’s selection, Is Everyone Ready for Fun? by Jan Thomas. Three happy cows and a frustrated chicken bounce through the pages of this light-hearted picture book. We love promoting this event at Manhattan Public Library, and each child who attends a storytime during the week will receive a free book! Funding for the free books is generously provided by the Manhattan Library Association.
My love for books began when I was very young. I have such fond memories of sitting in my mom’s lap while she read Don Wood’s The Little Mouse, The Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear to me night after night. She later told me that she had the book memorized since I requested it so many times. What a patient parent! Another of my all-time favorites is The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper. I remember chanting along with that brave engine, “I think I can, I think I can!” These engaging books stirred a desire in me to learn how to read the words on the pages.
readaloudAs a children’s librarian, I obviously endorse reading aloud to children, but research supports it, too. One example is a study by the U.S. Department of Education, which concluded with these words: “The single most important activity for building the knowledge required for eventual success in reading is reading aloud to children.” This quote is from The Read-Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease, a wonderful book filled with read-aloud suggestions and helpful tips for parents. Books include a wider vocabulary than we often encounter in television shows or everyday conversations. Even though children are unfamiliar with these new words, exposure to them is a stepping stone to reading independently. If they have heard the word before, they will be better equipped to know how to read it on the printed page.
A love for reading is just as important as the actual reading process. The fancy name for the desire to read is called print motivation. This is one of six skills children need in order to read successfully. The other skills are: Notice Print All Around; Talk, Talk, Talk; Tell Stories About Everything; Look for Letters Everywhere; and Take Time to Rhyme, Sing, and Play Word Games. These skills were originally identified by the American Library Association’s Every Child Ready to Read Program. Johnson County Public Library modified the information that program first developed, and they renamed it “6 by 6: Six Skills by Six Years.” Many of these skills are things parents already practice with their children without taking much time to consider the educational benefits. Things like pointing out the letters on a stop sign or words on a billboard can actually help children notice that words are all around them. Little habits like this can truly make a big difference in a child’s attitude toward reading.

Our librarians love to help children discover the joy of reading. Come visit us at the library for great book recommendations and resources for growing readers.

Posted in: Children's Dept, For Adults, For Kids, library services, Mercury Column, News, Parents

Leave a Comment (0) →

Honoring Veterans

TBR-Logo-BWIt is hard to believe that it is the 50th anniversary of the start of the Vietnam War. For many of us, it seems like only yesterday that our families and friends were watching the draft lotteries on television (hoping for a high number—the higher the number, the less likely you would be drafted), and sending letters overseas to servicemen. This momentous anniversary will be recognized at our local Veterans Day celebrations, which include events at the Manhattan Public Library.

This year, the Manhattan Public Library received a grant from the Kansas Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Arts allowing us to plan for a Big Read.  The Big Read is a program designed with the goal to encourage reading as a shared experience in the community, with grant funding allowing the purchase of books to give away, making speakers available, providing for the cost of printing materials and posters, etc. The Big Read  engages American readers by awarding grants to local communities for local Big Read projects.  By improving access to the art of literature readers will be able to connect with great works of literature. O
Our Big Read events have been planned in conjunction with the book The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien. This award-winning novel is considered a literary classic and has been taught in classrooms around the world since its publication in 1990.

thingsThe book is a fictionalized account of the author’s experiences as an infantryman in Vietnam. A collection of stories that comprise the novel, O’Brien conveys the chaos, fear and other feelings that make up warfare in his writing. ““War is hell, but that’s not the half of it, because war is also mystery and terror and adventure and courage and discovery and holiness and pity and despair and longing and love. War is nasty; war is fun. War is thrilling; war is drudgery. War makes you a man; war makes you dead.”

Our Big Read events include the parade on Veterans Day, where we will be handing out copies of the book “The Things They Carried” (while they last!) as well as the Vietnam Veteran’s Forum later in the afternoon. Also, stop by on Veterans Day or at the library during November and write a note on a Thank You to Veterans postcard. We will be sending these for distribution to VA Hospitals and other agencies that serve our Veterans.

An exciting and important event will take place on Veterans Day at 4:00 at the Wareham—the Vietnam Veterans Forum. Several distinguished local Vietnam Veterans will discuss their experiences during the war in Vietnam. Join us to hear their stories and their reflections on the Vietnam War. The Flint Hills Veterans Coalition has been very helpful in organizing and planning for the forum.

We have planned two book discussions for community members. On Thursday Nov. 13 at 6:00pm, we are sponsoring Books and Brew—a discussion at Little Apple Brewery. Appetizers will be provided, and food and drink may be ordered. If you can’t make it to the Brewery, we will be having another discussion of the book at the Good Books Club on Thursday, Nov. 20 at 7:00 pm at the library. Refreshments will be provided.

 

Posted in: Adult Services, For Adults, News

Leave a Comment (0) →

Author Visit: Diane Eickhoff , author of “Clarina Nichols and the Pioneering Crusade for Women’s Rights”

by Susan Withee, Adult Services Manager

 

revolutionaryThis month’s meeting of the library’s new “Good Books” discussion series will welcome, in person, author Diane Eickhoff who will speak about her book “Revolutionary Heart: The Life of Clarina Nichols and the Pioneering Crusade for Women’s Rights.” This book is the biography of an extraordinary Kansas pioneer who was involved in the 19th century abolition and temperance movements, and who fought her own very personal fight for women’s legal rights to property, child custody, and the vote. Clarina Nichols was born and raised on a farm in Vermont, survived a troubled first marriage, and won a hard-fought court battle to retain custody of her children. She was successfully married a second time to a Vermont newspaper publisher and eventually took over the publishing of the newspaper. She became an eloquent journalist and passionate public speaker on the subjects of abolition and votes for women. Nichols joined the mid-century exodus of New England abolitionists to Kansas Territory to fight for free-state status and was an early resident of both Quindaro and Lawrence. She worked with and made speaking appearances with Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and other suffragist leaders, although her name is not as well known. This biography, well written and filled with great primary historical sources such as Clarina Nichols’ letters, speeches, and memoirs, introduces the reader to a regrettably little-known Kansas activist.

Please join us at the public library for the program and Good Books Discussion series on Thursday, October 30, at 7:00 p.m. in the Groesbeck Room.  This program is free and open to the public.

Posted in: Adult Services, For Adults, library services

Leave a Comment (0) →

Those are my relatives??!!

by Judi Nechols, Adult Services Librarian

charetingPopular here at Manhattan Public Library are our Genealogy Resources. We have many print resources—books such as Genealogy Online for Dummies, Charting your Family History:  Includes Legacy; Family Tree software version 2.0, on CD-ROM, for Microsoft Windows, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska Civil War Veterans; and A Genealogist’s Guide to Discovering your Female Ancestors: Special Strategies for Uncovering Hard-to-find Information about your Female Lineage. (more…)

Posted in: Adult Services, For Adults, library services, News

Leave a Comment (0) →

September is Library Card Sign-up Month

Mary Newkirk, Adult Services Librarian

background-280x179
The observance was launched in 1987 to meet the challenge of then Secretary of Education William J. Bennett who said: “Let’s have a national campaign…every child should obtain a library card – and use it.” Since then, thousands of public and school libraries join each fall in a national effort to ensure every child does just that. A library card may be the most important school supply of all.
Ten reasons everyone should have a library card:
1. You are already paying for it. During these tough economic times, why would you pay double for something?
2. Save money. While you may want to own a few favorite titles, do you really need all those books? Anyone who has ever moved will tell you, “Moving boxes of books stinks.”
3. You get to try titles and genres you might otherwise miss. You may not want to plunk down $20 just to find out you that you detest the latest craze in vampire romance novels.
4. Reading broadly makes you smarter. Studies have repeatedly shown that vocabulary development, language acquisition and background knowledge are all improved in those who have been exposed to a variety of information.
5. You can get more than books with your library card. The library offers an amazing array of products and services: DVDs, CDs, magazines, newspapers, movie nights, computer use, homework help, college prep, kid & teen programs, author visits, career planning, and free classes.
6. Libraries are better than bookstores. If the bookstore doesn’t have a title or subject you are searching for, you can get it through Interlibrary Loan. The library also has 24-hour online access. Bookstores close, but you can access databases and reference information while sitting in your pajamas.
7. Free WiFi. No more mocha latte obligations for you.
8. You can have a mobile library with you on your smart phone or device. The fastest growing library use is downloading ebooks and audiobooks.
9. You can find a comfortable, friendly, welcoming spot away from all those ‘honey-do’ jobs.
10. You will keep all the librarians happy talking about their first love – books!

Posted in: Adult Services, For Adults, library services

Leave a Comment (0) →

Library Tips and Tricks: Readers Advisory at the Library

By Judi Nechols, Adult Services Librarian

Have you ever finished a book and, with a sigh, thought you would never be able to find another author whose writing appealed to you as much? Or have you walked into the library and wandered in the stacks of books, with no idea how to choose a book you might enjoy? Readers’ Advisory is our way to connect readers to new authors or books to enjoy. 

There are several Readers’ Advisory tools available at Manhattan Public Library to help you to find the perfect book!

  • Novelist is an addition to our online catalog that makes it easy to find writers or stories of a similar style to one you’ve enjoyed. Just look up a book you have read in our catalog. Click on “Full Display” on the right. Scroll down the page and you will find a section with “Suggestions and More,” where both Authors and Titles are listed that are written in a similar style. Novelist makes recommendations for both fiction and nonfiction books.
  • BookTALK_homepage_iconThe BookTalk link is located on our home page (www.mhklibrary.org). BookTalk is a searchable collection of book reviews written by Manhattan Public Library staff members, with reviews of fiction and non-fiction books as well as DVD’s. Just click on the box titled BookTalk on our home page. The most recent reviews will appear first. Scroll down and you can browse through hundreds of reviews, or search for reviews for books by a favorite author or genre.

 

  • The Readers’ Advisory Table is located near the Information Desk and has lots of lists for genres, series and read-alikes for authors—pick one up and head to the stacks to find a book.

A Personalized Reading List form can be completed online or in a paper form (available on the Readers’ Advisory Table). Just tell us your favorite authors or subjects, why you enjoyed a certain book, and we will provide you with a list of titles that we hope you will enjoy.

 

blood bedlamLocated on our genre display cases, we have books available to help you find a new author or series. The Genreflecting Advisory series includes several titles, such as “Blood, Bedlam, Bullets, and Badguys : a reader’s guide to adventure/suspense fiction”, “Historical Fiction : a guide to the genre”, “The Real Story : a guide to nonfiction reading interests” and “Genrefied Classics : a guide to reading interests in classic literature.”

  • Library Staff members are avid readers and are always willing to assist fellow readers in finding new authors or titles—just ask us! We are glad to show you how to find and use our Readers’ Advisory materials and staff may also tell you about the most recent good book that they have read!! MPL Librarians are skilled at providing Readers Advisory and are here to help you find your way to your next favorite book or author!

With so many resources for finding books to suit your preferences, we’re sure you can find something new and enjoyable at Manhattan Public Library to suit your reading preferences.

 

Posted in: Adult Services, For Adults, library services, News

Leave a Comment (0) →

Book Discussions this Fall at MPL!

If you or your book club would like to join us for book discussions this fall, check out the books and start reading!

ghostSeptember 25 at 7:00 pm, we will discuss The Ghost Map by Steven Johnson. This is the K-State Book Network’s Common Read for 2014, and the devastating effects of cholera and the search for the cause of this deadly disease is written about in this book–a fascinating look at scientific investigation in the Victorian era.

 

October 30 at 7:00 pm we will have the exciting opportunity to discuss the book Revolutionary Heart with the author, Diane Eickoff! The main character of this book is a charismatic suffragist who helped pave the way for change for women.

 

 

carriedNovember 20 at 7:00 pm, The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien will be discussed with a guest discussion leader. Sponsored by the Kansas Humanities Council, this discussion is part of the events planned for the Manhattan Big Read of this poignant and fascinating look at American soldiers in Vietnam.

 

We hope you can join us for any or all of these discussions!

Posted in: Adult Services, For Adults

Leave a Comment (0) →

KSBN Focus: The Ghost Map

By Marcia Allen, Technical Services Manager

ghost

Each academic year, the K-State Book Network (KSBN) selects an exceptional book for a common reading experience. In conjunction with that all-university-read, campus activities, classroom experiences, and community programs are offered that share additional insights into the book. In the past years, enthusiastic participants have been fortunate enough to share in the reading of outstanding titles like Ready Player One, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Zeitoun, and The Hunger Games.

This year’ title is an equally stellar selection. The Ghost Map by Steven Johnson, which was first published in 2006, is an amazing tale of detective work and perseverance that will demand your attention despite its sometimes appalling content. Here’s a hint about the levels of appeal that the book presents.

First of all, it’s a graphic examination of living conditions in 19th century London. While the story begins with a lengthy description of the scavengers (night-soil men) who sought items for recycling in the filth of the city, the real focus is on a cholera epidemic which began in 1854 in the neighborhood of Broad Street. As is often the case, the first one or two deaths quickly multiplied, and in a period of some ten days, more than 500 people lost their lives.

Secondly, the book is an excellent account of the life of disease, as well as the common beliefs about contagion. Johnson does an exceptional job of describing the source, the growth, and the resulting symptoms and death that accompany a cholera outbreak. The close proximity of cesspools to drinking water sources and the density of the population combined for a perfect hosting environment for the epidemic. Coupled with those physical conditions were the common beliefs in “miasma,” or poisoned atmosphere, as the cause of sickness. Neither medical experts nor average citizens understood the actual causes of contagion, so few productive efforts were made to stop the spread of disease.

Third, and perhaps most interesting, this is an incredible detective story. Dedicated physician John Snow had done pioneering work with the newly discovered use of anesthetics, but he had also pondered the frequent outbreaks of cholera for some years, and even attempted to chart the deaths. When this sudden horrific outbreak near Broad Street caught his attention, he began questioning the unthinkable: Could the water supply be related to the epidemic? At the same time, local clergyman Henry Whitehead began work on his own study involving the reach and duration of the outbreak. Because Whitehead knew his congregation so well, he was able to pinpoint dates of deaths as well as numbers lost to the outbreak. In fact, it was actually his discovery of the timespan when the first victim sickened and died that brought the two investigators together. From that point, the two men were able to chart the spread of the epidemic throughout the neighborhood. Thus, the “ghost map” of the title is the carefully documented layout of the related deaths throughout the area.
Of course, these dedicated souls did not bring about immediate change in London. But their pioneering work served as an impetus for early developments in waste-removal and sanitary water supply that not only improved the health of thousands, but also restored the vigor of the much-polluted Thames River.

If you are interested in learning more about the book and its contents, the following programs are scheduled:
On Science Saturday, September 6 at 10:00 a.m., in the MPL’s lower atrium, Ginny Bernard from Riley County Extension will guide listeners of all ages through some hands-on experiments concerning diseases, germs and water contamination. You can register here.

On Thursday, September 11th at 7:00 p.m., there is an author talk in McCain Auditorium with Steven Johnson. Tickets are required to attend the free event and will be available for community members on Wednesday, September 3 at the Manhattan Public Library.

On Thursday, September 25th at 7:00 p.m., there is a Good Books Club Book Discussion to be held in the Groesbeck Room of MPL. Snacks will be provided.

Please plan to attend these events if your schedule allows, and enjoy your reading of the book. It’s a one-of-a-kind reading experience.

Posted in: For Adults, Mercury Column, News

Leave a Comment (0) →

Science Saturdays: Survival 101

Couldn’t survive five minutes out in the wilderness? Then, this program is for you. Learn the ropes of wilderness survival with Daniel Schapaugh. Katniss and Peeta will have nothing on you after this program. Be there on Saturday, July 19th at 10:00 in the Groesbeck Room. See you there! Recommended for tweens to adults.

Posted in: Adult Services, Children's Dept, For Adults, For Kids, For Teens, Young Adult Dept

Leave a Comment (0) →
Page 1 of 3 123