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Posts Tagged archive-Storytelling

Shake-It-Up Tales: Stories to Sing, Dance, Drum, and Act Out by Margaret Read MacDonald

  Stories are meant to be shared, and it’s even more fun to act out, dance, or sing the stories! The twenty, short stories in the book are great for acting out with props,
chanting parts as a group, or drumming beats together. One that we’ve used in storytime is called El Conejito (the little rabbit). Conejito sings a silly song and
dances, and the audience can join in with him during the story. These stories can be enjoyed by just two or three people or bigger groups.
-Recommended by Laura

Posted in: Children's Dept, For Kids, Parents

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Build a Snowman!

This rhyme is great for the Holidays and can be used with practically any age group!  It is such a fun rhyme that kids will be entertained in all sorts of ways! You can also get very creative with this rhyme by acting it out and letting the kids use their imaginations.

Build a Snowman

to the tune of “Oh My Darling Clementine”

Build a snowman,
Build a snowman,
Build a snowman,
Big and round.
Shape three snowballs, different sizes
Stack them tall, then spin around.

Dress the snowman,
Dress the snowman,
Dress the snowman,
Big and round.
Dress him in last winter’s clothes,
Tie his scarf so he won’t frown.

When the sun,
When the sun,
When the sun
Shines so bright,
Watch him melt and disappear
Vanishing and out of sight.

Save his clothes,
Save his clothes,
Save his clothes,
Don’t throw them out!
Soon the snow will fall again.
And you’ll see them all about.

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Fun booklists and fingerplays

I stumbled upon a great resource for planning storytimes around a specific theme. It’s from the King County Library System’s website (listed below). Even though this library is located in Washington state, I can still benefit from their very extensive list of themes, read-aloud suggestions, activities, and fingerplays, without actually visiting their building! Their themes include topics like the seasons, animals, fun with music, and about 100 more! Check it out: www.kcls.org/bookstogrowon/

-recommended by Laura

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The Storyteller’s Cornucopia by Cathie Cooper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes it’s fun to tell a story in a creative, unusual way. That’s why I really like this book! Besides giving several suggestions for picture books to read aloud, it offers extension activities and crafts to accompany the books. Templates are included for crafts and printable games. The author includes ideas for using puppets and props in storytime as well. It’ s a great resource for parents who are looking for new ways to share stories with their children at home.

Recommended by Laura

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Lola Loves Stories Flannel Board

Lola Loves Stories Flannel Board

The Kansas Reads to Preschooler 2012 book is Lola Loves Stories. This flannel board expands on the book by presenting other stories that Lola might read and asking listeners to select the appropriate hat for Lola to pretend with. To do this at home, you just need some dress up clothes that go with some of your child’s favorite books.

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Show Me a Story

Telling stories is one important aspect of early literacy. Show Me a Story by Emily Neuburger, a new book in our Parent’s Shelf collection, is full of good ideas to prompt children young and old to participate in storytelling. This would be a great resource for parents to use with their preschoolers, for people who want to supplement school with fun learning activities at home, or for homeschoolers. Here are a few of my favorite ideas:

  • Story Grab Bag: a sack filled with images you’ve drawn or cut out of magazines, used to prompt story ideas
  • a list of Story Sparks: for when you’re at a loss for a character, setting, or detail
  • Traveling Puppet Theater: a simple cardboard backdrop with puppets on craft sticks, threaded through a slit on the page
  • Create the Past activity: have children make up a complete (fictional) history of an object such as a piece of beach glass, an apron, or a skyscraper.

The book also includes a comprehensive materials chapter, as well as a useful index. I highly recommend it!

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Paper bag puppets

librarian showing 2 paper bag puppets

Miss Laura with her cow and frog puppets

Animal stories can easily be acted out using simple paper bag puppets, which is also a really fun craft.  The website abcteach.com has some cute paper bag puppet patterns you can print for free.  Paper bags are inexpensive, and children may learn some new fine motor skills when they figure out how to move their hand to make the animals’ mouths open and close.  Puppets are excellent for encouraging imaginative play, dialogue skills, story recall and confidence for performing in front of others.  Create a simple puppet stage by letting children sit behind a couch or a table with a tablecloth.  Show them how stick their puppets up high to perform a show, and supply them with lots of applause!

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The Wizard, the Fairy, and the Magic Chicken by Helen Lester

You wouldn’t normally think a wizard, a fairy, and a chicken would be in the same story, but if it’s a fairy tale, anything goes! This fun book tells the story of these three magical creatures, each trying to outdo the other. I saw this story performed by a storyteller, and I immediately wanted to use it with children at the library. I turned it into a readers’ theatre with simple props and costumes. The kids in my second and third grade summer club loved it! It helped them practice their reading and acting skills, too. The book is also great to just read aloud to children of all ages.

Reviewed by Laura

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Three Billy Goats Gruff

This works well with a small group of school age kids, but could be adapted for other sizes/ages.  Supplies needed – two dry erase boards or posterboard, some markers, 3 billy goat and 1 troll puppets/masks or some kind of representation, and a copy of the well-known fairy tale “The Three Billy Goats Gruff.” I like to use Paul Galdone’s version.

Ask for 2 volunteers who are artists or who like to draw.  Ask one to draw a large bridge on the board on one side, and the other to draw a hill with grass and flowers on the other side.

Ask for 3 volunteers to play goats.  As your artists draw, give your other volunteers some quick instructions about what happens during the story. They need to know who is the small billy goat Gruff, medium goat, and large goat.  Decide whether you will read all the lines and they will just act out their part, or if you want them to say some of their lines. For older kids, you could have lines printed out in advance that they could read.

Plan to play the part of the troll and the narrator. The troll’s role is key because he has to interrupt each goat as they are going across the bridge, and his voice needs to be pretty loud and a little scary.

Act out the story with the goats pretending to go over the bridge, meet the troll, and go on over to the meadow.  Everyone watching can help with the “Trip, trap, trip, trap!” parts.  When the largest billy goat Gruff butts the troll, he can fall behind the bridge board.

If your kids love acting out stories, you may have to repeat it a few times allowing others to play parts or re-draw scenes.

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Retelling the Gigantic Turnip

Several of us love using the Russian folktale about the giant turnip in storytimes. We have a flannel board of the story, but there are also plenty of books that tell it.  You can read the text of the story here.  After telling the story, kids can act it out.  Ask for volunteers to come up and play the different parts, starting with the old man.  He pretends to pull as hard as he can on invisible turnip leaves.  Each time a person/animal is added, they hold on to the waist of the person in front of them and they all pull.  Kids love being chosen to be the mouse, who helps the group finally succeed in pulling up the gigantic turnip.

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