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Stimulate Your Brain with S.T.E.M.

By Jennifer Bergen, Youth Services Manager

Electrical Wizard: How Nikola Tesla Lit Up the WorldS.T.E.M. education is opening doors for young people by offering them different ways to learn about science, technology, engineering and math, and by seeing how those disciplines are incorporated into our every day lives, from our homes, our world, and beyond.  The library is the perfect place to explore S.T.E.M. ideas, no matter your age.

Here are some titles that could be starting points for introducing S.T.E.M. concepts through stories of real people. As ideas spark, children can wonder off through the subject “neighborhoods” in the Children’s Room and take home a pile of books to peruse later.

Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine by Laurie Wallmark follows Lovelace from her childhood, estranged from her father Lord Byron and encouraged by her mother to learn mathematics, through her friendship with inventor Charles Babbage when Ada created the first computer program. Gorgeous illustrations by April Chu will keep young readers hooked, and they can continue reading about famous females in Women Who Launched the Computer Age by Laurie Calkhoven or Trailblazers: 33 Women in Science Who Changed the World by Rachel Swaby.

In Elizabeth Rusch’s Electrical Wizard: How Nikola Tesla Lit Up the World, kids learn how Tesla first came up with his idea for alternating currents, and how his invention was chosen above Thomas Edison’s for lighting the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair.

Remember learning about the Fibonacci code? Joseph D’Agnese’s Blockhead is an intriguing picture book about Leonardo Fibonacci’s challenging life and his special discovery of number sequences in nature. Similarly, Paul Erdos’s unusual life is recounted in Deborah Heiligman’s The Boy Who Loved Math. “Uncle Paul” Erdos was strange and socially inept, yet he was beloved by many, and he furthered the study of mathematics in numerous areas.

More topics can be explored by identifying a child’s interests or passions, and using that as a springboard to learn more. This summer, we added four books from the Science of the Summer Olympics series. Check out titles like The Science Behind Swimming, Diving and Other Water Sports if you had a great time watching the Olympics as a family.

Kids who are into popular mainstream shows will appreciate the Batman Science series which explores the “real-world science and engineering” of Batman’s suits, vehicles and utility belt. The Max Axiom, Super Scientist graphic novel series presents S.T.E.M. topics through comic book adventures.

Hands-on kids will enjoy the many books with instructions and ideas for projects they can create themselves.  3-D Engineering: Design and Build Your Own Prototypes with 25 Projects provides enough instruction for kids to test strategies for building anything from bridges to alarms. Lego has produced a whole slew of big, exciting books full of ideas for new things to build, such as the Lego Adventure books. The books foster imaginative creations and experimenting with structures.

No one is too young to experience S.T.E.M.  Babies and toddlers have a natural curiosity that leads them to taste, touch, explore and experiment with everything around them.  While this can make childcare a little hectic, parents can easily encourage children by asking and answering questions, describing things to increase vocabulary, and allowing children to play safely with a variety of household items.  A new board book series called “Baby Loves” by Ruth Spiro captures the enthusiasm for S.T.E.M. In Baby Loves Aerospace Engineering, simple sentences and colorful, bright illustrations present questions and answers about things that fly – birds, airplanes, and a rocket. Andrea Beatty’s picture books — Ada Twist, Scientist, Rosie Revere, Engineer and Iggy Peck, Architect – are also good introductions for younger listeners.

Experience S.T.E.M. at library programs, too! Every Tuesday, Chess Club for all ages and abilities meets on the first floor of the library, starting at 5:30.  It is run by the K-State Chess Club, and beginners are welcome.  S.T.E.M. Club for K-3rd graders meets on the second Thursday of the month from 4:00-5:00 in the Children’s Room.  This week, kids will find out if they really know the story of The Three Little Pigs. Activities include exploring various building materials, learning about their properties, and even building little houses to test against the big bad wolf. Later in the year, library staff will be incorporating Sphero robots into some programs for different ages. The library is a great resource for getting your kids excited about S.T.E.M.

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Babies Need Board Books

By Amber Johnson, Youth Services Library Assistant

ABC Alphabet FunAs babies grow into toddlers and begin exploring the world around them, books play a very important role.  Books offer an experience outside of their everyday world, as well as access to vocabulary and concepts that will be important as their language develops.  Not unlike other objects in their lives, babies interact with books by chewing on them and throwing them around.  Because of these developmentally appropriate actions, it is vital to offer sturdy books for them to play with.  Enter the board book.  A board book is made of thick paperboard.  The paperboard is used for the covers and the inside pages.  A board book is specially scored, folded and bound, unlike traditional hardback binding.  Board books are generally smaller than paperback or hardback picture books, making them easier for tiny hands to grasp.  Manhattan Public Library has a great selection of board books.  Here are a few that we might suggest starting with.

Touch and feel books: Even though they don’t yet have words to describe what they are experiencing, babies take in the world around them with all their senses.   Books that have different textures that the baby can feel only expands their view.  Putting books in their mouths is a developmentally appropriate action.  Having shiny and dull illustrations offers depth perception understanding.  Offer them books about animals that have pretend fur and scales.  Check out books with vehicles that are squishy and shiny.  The DK Touch and Feel series is a great series to start with when introducing your child to sensory books.

High contrast books: Some board books contain illustrations only in black and white.  The high contrast in color of these books is developmentally appropriate for younger babies.  When very young, babies can only take in illustrations or things around them when there is a stark difference in color value.  As they develop their eyesight, introducing books with bright colors is a great idea. Author Tana Hoban has many books with simple black and white illustrations.

Simple concept books: It is never too early to introduce simple learning concepts to babies.  Books that feature numbers, colors and the alphabet will help them begin their journey of learning.  Teaching shapes to children directly correlates to their learning of numbers and the alphabet.  These books also allow them to flip around in the book instead of reading it straight through.  A few good titles to consider are ABC Alphabet Fun and My Very First Book of Numbers.

Books with real photos: As is true for adults, it is important for babies to see themselves in books, as well as things and people that are different from them.  Many board books feature photos of babies expressing different emotions, or photos of real animals or toys.  When babies see real photos in the books they are reading, it makes it easier for them to identify objects and people in real life.  I See Me is a great example of a book that contains photos of babies on the move.

Nursery rhyme books: Reading books with rhymes helps children develop a sense of rhythm when reading.  Hearing similar sounds over and over gives meaning to the words themselves.  Books containing nursery rhymes allow parents to repeat the same rhymes over and over again, solidifying the rhythm and flow of the text. Manhattan Public Library offers collections such as The Real Mother Goose Board Book or books with just one rhyme as the text of the book, like Humpty Dumpty.

Manhattan Public Library has hundreds of board books available for checkout, including the aforementioned titles and series.  Library card holders have no limit as to the amount of books they can check out.  Youth Services staff are available to recommend more good titles and to talk more about early literacy skills and child development.

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And It’s Back to School Again

By Jennifer Bergen, Youth Services Manager

School's First Day of SchoolFor families with school age kids, this is the weekend when everything catches up to us. It’s time to clean up the room, set out the school supplies, get new shoes and a new haircut.  Time to try to get excitable summer-smitten kids to feel sleepy at 8 p.m.  School is here!

Along with the new duds and backpacks, kids might be carrying additional worries or trepidations as they enter school halls. Reading some of these books together might ease their stress and put a positive and humorous spin on the beginning of the school year.

School’s First Day of School by Adam Rex (The True Meaning of Smekday) humorously covers the well-worn territory of first day nerves.  Of course, the children coming to school have a wide range of emotions and experiences, but what about the school itself? The new school is worried and excited, friendly and embarrassed, and finally kind of comfortable, too. Artwork by the most recent Caldecott Medal winner Matt de la Pena (Last Stop on Market Street) is a bonus.

Frank and Lucky Get Schooled is a treat for little learners who enjoy a bit of intellectual content in their picture books. Newbery Medal winner Lynne Rae Perkins introduces a boy and his canine best buddy as they experience running and playing together, as well as time apart during the school day. Although they are in different situations, both boy and dog learn important lessons. Readers will get just a taste of fascinating topics like molecules, infinity, and fractions through the eyes of Frank and Lucky.

Kindergarten is Cool by Linda Marshall will give those 5 and 6 year olds a better idea of what to expect when they walk into their first school classroom. For those just entering preschool, Bear’s Big Day by Salina Yoon addresses the paradox of wanting to be an independent big kid, but not ready to leave the toddler realm entirely. Need a gift for a teacher or a great story to volunteer to read to the class? Todd Parr’s simple text and bright illustrations in Teachers Rock! affirm all the ways teachers impact their students. It will be a favorite for Teacher Appreciation Week, too.

Older readers will find out how a bad school situation can get much worse in Mac Barnett’s second chapter book about the Terrible Two. Miles Murphy and Niles Sparks are best friends, and they are members of the Terrible Two pranksters club…the only two members.  When one of their school pranks goes too far, their annoying principal Mr. Barkin is relieved from duty, but in his place reigns the even more horrific new principal, Mr. Barkin’s father!  Filled with humor and funny illustrations, this will suit fans of Captain Underpants and Wimpy Kid. The Terrible Two and The Terrible Two Get Worse are available at the library, or as downloadable ebooks from the Sunflower eLibrary (Overdrive) and Hoopla, so you can read it anywhere you like.

Last but not least, don’t miss out on Gary Paulsen’s new novella for middle to upper elementary grades.  Paulsen (Hatchet, Mr. Tucket, Liar Liar) is a seasoned writer for kids and knows how to keep their attention with just the right touch of sarcasm and wit. In Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, he throws six random students together in a bizarre situation that ultimately leads to new connections and friendships. Teachers will also love this book for its high level vocabulary, short length, and the opportunity for a class activity using the second half of the book – a one-act play retelling the story.

When you visit the library to check out new books, you’ll notice that back to school at the library means new, exciting programs for youth.  Look at the library’s events online to find out about STEM Club for K-3rd graders, Tween Club for 4th-6th graders, and CanTEEN for middle and high schoolers.  Homeschool Afternoons are back, as well as Read with a Dog Sundays, and nine Storytime options each week. Hundreds of kids participated in the Summer Reading program this year, 2,902 to be exact, and we hope you all will be back this fall!


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A Treasure Trove of Titles

by Brian Ingalsbe, Children’s Librarian

July is here, and if your children are anything like me, they have finished all of their “must-read” lists, and are in search of something new and refreshing. Luckily, there is always one place I turn to in the children’s collection: the new books shelf. These titles are hot off the press, and can offer a great variety for any reader. Here are just a few of the options I’ve discovered.

Bridget Wilder, Spy in TrainingBridget Wilder: Spy-in-Training by Jonathan Bernstein
Middle school meets Mission Impossible in this hilarious spy series. Jonathan Bernstein has created a character who excels at only one thing: being invisible. When Bridget discovers that her father – Carter Strike – is one of the most famous superspies in the world, her ability to fly under the radar becomes her greatest asset. Equipped with a super tracksuit and her wit, Bridget begins her spy training in her very own backyard – including fighting bullies and destroying healthy food machines! This series is great for middle-grade children who enjoy the writing style of Chris Rylander, Stuart Gibbs, and Ally Carter. A must read!

monstrous by MarcyKate ConnollyMonstrous by MarcyKate Connolly
Night is the only time that Kymera can enter the dangerous city of Bryre, for she must not be seen by humans. Her father says they would not understand her wings, the bolts in her neck, or her spiky tail – they would kill her. They would not understand that she was created for a purpose: to rescue the girls of Bryre. Yet Kymera’s task is almost impossible, until she meets a boy named Ren. It is only with his help – and courage – that Kymera can save the girls of Bryre. MarcyKate Connolly’s debut book weaves a tale full of suspense, magic, betrayal, and even romance. This book reminds me of Beyonders or The Familiars. Any reader who loved those series should definitely grab this.

Free VerseFree Verse by Sarah Dooley
When her brother dies in a fire, Sasha Harless has no one left and nowhere to turn. After her father died in the mines and her mother ran off, he was her last caretaker. They’d always dreamed of leaving Caboose, West Virginia together someday, but instead she’s in foster care, feeling more stuck and broken than ever. Sarah Dooley has created a character who is truly inspiring. Sasha’s journey through life and loss teaches her valuable lessons: that life, like poetry, doesn’t always take the form you intend. If your child doesn’t mind some deeper emotional story content, this is a great pick. Readers who enjoyed Counting by 7’s and Walk Two Moons are sure to love this book!

Finders KeepersFinders Keepers by Shelley Tougas
Who doesn’t love a good mystery about hidden treasure and Al Capone? Shelley Tougas – author of The Graham Cracker Plot – returns with another high-stakes story that involves just that. Christa loves spending summers at her parent’s cabin on Whitefish Lake, but when her father loses his job, it’s up to Christa and her friend Alex to save the cabin. All hope seems lost, until Alex’s grandpa – nicknamed grumpa – tells the friends about Al Capone’s CURSED treasure. Can Alex and Christa find the treasure and save their cabin? This story is a great mystery for children who have a harder time with reading. The action and quick paced writing make it hard to put down.

No matter what hidden gems you are looking for, Manhattan Public Library has them! Our staff are always willing to help you find your next reading treasure trove, answer any questions, connect you with the community, or just be a friendly face. You can contact the Youth Services Department at (785) 776-4741 ext. 400 or

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The Summer Reading List Begins

By Jennifer Bergen, Children’s Services Manager

On your mark, get set…READ!  The library’s annual summer reading program has begun. Everyone, from babies to seniors, can participate by keeping track of reading and earning prizes or tickets for prize drawings. So, what is on your summer reading list?  Here are a few on mine:

Pax by Sara Pennypacker

The author of the Clementine series has written a very different kind of story, switching from her spunky, comedic, Ramona-like character Clementine, to what looks like a quiet, thoughtful, and likely sad tale about a boy and his pet fox.  Booklist gave this a starred review, saying “Pennypacker’s expert, evenhanded storytelling reveals stunning depth in a relatively small package.” It sounds like Pennypacker is able to switch gears with skill and finesse.

We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement that Defied Adolf Hitler by Russell Freedman

Freedman has won many awards for his nonfiction writing, and I have enjoyed several of them. I prefer my nonfiction to read like a novel, and Freedman’s well-researched accounts always deliver that element of storytelling. Hans Scholl and his sister Sophie were Hitler Youth who turned against Hitler, forming the White Rose opposition.  They sacrificed everything to work against the Nazis. Seems like a worthy and important read.

Soar by Joan Bauer

Bauer’s books are always worth a read, and this one sounds inspiring.  Jeremiah Lopper is a baseball fanatic, but he hasn’t been allowed to play since he had a heart transplant two years ago at the age of 10.  When he and his adoptive dad move to Hillcrest, Ohio, Jeremiah simply decides to find a baseball team to coach instead. Words reviewers used to describe this story are “motivating,” “triumphant,” “largehearted,” and “irrepressible.” I will grab this when I need some lifting up.

Forest of Wonders by Linda Sue Park

Another author veering off into new genre territory, Linda Sue Park has written the first in a fantasy series called Wing & Claw.  Previous books like A Long Walk to Water, Project Mulberry, and Newbery Medal-winning A Single Shard are realistic or even based on true stories.  Now she enters the realm of magic and talking animals. Raffa Santana is a young apothecary who seeks out a rare vine in the Forest of Wonders to create a cure for an injured bat. Unexpectedly, the bat not only recovers but also acquires the ability to speak. Gregor the Overlander comes to mind, and I am in.

Wolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk

Sometimes, I admit I judge books by their covers. When I saw this one with its intriguing gold-lettered message facing out, I had to read the cover. Then I had to quickly place a hold on the book. To top that off, Publisher’s Weekly mentions two favorite books of mine in its review of Wolf Hollow: “Echoing the tone and themes found in To Kill a Mockingbird and Summer of My German Soldier, this WWII story traces the unlikely friendship between a country girl and a shell-shocked veteran.” It is sure to be a good one.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child: The Official Script Book of the Original West End Production by J. K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany

Well, I wouldn’t be much of a children’s librarian if this was not on my list, would I?  Coming out on July 31 (Harry’s birthday, of course), this play script features Harry’s middle child, Albus Serverus Potter. As expected, there is much news and a plethora of opinions about this “eighth story” in the Harry Potter series that was supposed to end with book seven.  We will see if the Harry Potter craze continues, and if it lives up to the hype. Not much chance I will see the play anytime soon, since it is in London and is sold out through May 2017.

Stop by the Children’s Room to sign up for summer reading, and let us know which books you are hoping to read under a shady tree this summer! While you’re here, check into our weekly clubs and storytimes, vote for a winner in the Tournament of Books, and register a teen to attend the “After Hours” party at the library this Saturday for an Iron Chef-inspired culinary competition. It’s sure to be hopping at the library with lots of good options for everyone.

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We Like Sports and We Don’t Care Who Knows

by Amber Johnson, Youth Librarian

With only a few weeks left of school, the Youth Services Department at Manhattan Public Library is gearing up for the summer reading program and all the summer events planned for children of all ages.  Parents: you might be gearing up for summer in a different way, stocking your minivans with snacks and sports equipment, preparing for a summer of activities with your children.  For many students, summer is the time to try out a new activity or improve their skills in their favorite sport.  With NBA finals in motion, are your children obsessed with the Golden State Warriors?  We have books for them.  Do your children watch the Royals and wonder how Alcides Escobar knows how to make such great plays?  We have books for them.  Here are a few of my favorite titles about sports:

Jake Maddox series

An early chapter book series, the Jake Maddox books are perfect for students reading at a kindergarten to 2nd grade level.  Book topics range from dance to football to paintball.  Each book takes place over just a few days, so the comprehension level is low, but the action level is high.

Comeback Kids series by Mike Lupica

As a sports columnist for many publications, Mike Lupica knows how to write and talk about sports.  But in his Comeback Kids series, it is evident that he knows how to write about life as well.  This middle grade series, recommended for 2nd-4th grade reading levels, details the sports lives and personal lives of students.  As they deal with issues at home or issues at school, playing on a team gives them an escape and a way to process how life works and how to become the person they want to be.

Baseball Great series by Tim Green

Similar to the Comeback Kids series but for older readers, Tim Green pairs sports and personal issues to offer books that will entertain sports lovers, and give them a gateway to reading other types of realistic fiction.  Green’s books are full of action, and readers will enjoy the play-by-play of the games being experienced by the characters.

Nonfiction series about teams and athletes

The Children’s Library has many series and books on individual athletes and professional sports teams.  Look in the general non-fiction section under the call number 796, or ask a librarian to help you find a specific title.

Parents and caregivers: the library has books for you as well.  Whether you are spending hours on the bleachers at games, or traveling to weekend tournaments, there are multiple ways to access audiobooks for free.  Check out a physical copy of an audiobook on CD, download from the Sunflower eLibrary, or download the Hoopla app to access even more free titles.  Here are a few titles you might enjoy listening to:

Those Guys Have All the Fun by James Andrew Miller

A compilation of over 500 interviews, this history of the sports media tycoon that is ESPN brings to light just how it grew to be what it is today.

Wonder Girl by Don Van Natta, Jr.

Babe Didrikson was quite possibly the most phenomenal female athlete of the early 20th century.  After achieving All-American status in basketball and winning gold medals in track and field at the 1932 Olympics, she moved on to try her hand at golf.  Finding success there as well, she used her skill and influence to make a name for women in sports and conquered personal difficulties in the public eye.

The Long Run by Matt Long

New York City firefighter Matt Long suffered a tragic accident that had him in the hospital for five months, enduring through more than 40 operations.  After being told he would be lucky to walk again, Long went on to run the NYC marathon a mere three years later.  The Long Run details the physical and psychological difficulties that he faced during this journey.

Summer can be a rich time for students and parents, and the library is here to help you make the most of your time.  Ask a librarian for help finding your next great book or audiobook.


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Perfect Weather and Perfect Books to Share

By Jennifer Bergen, Youth Services Manager

Spring weather has blown in to Manhattan. It’s a time to appreciate Earth’s beauty, head out on the nature trail or spend an evening at the ball diamond. Here are some children’s books that pair nicely with the season.

Greensburg, Kansas is celebrated in Allan Drummond’s newest picture book, Green City: How One Community Survived a Tornado and Rebuilt for a Sustainable Future. Beginning with the aftermath of the 2007 tornado, Drummond portrays the damaged town, the worried citizens, and the many decisions that had to be made. Children can see how a few bright ideas about rebuilding Greensburg “green” caught on and took hold throughout the whole community. Sidebars give further information about influential townspeople and building sustainable structures. Published just in time for Earth Day, this will be a popular resource for teachers and an inspiration to young students all over the U.S.

Cricket Song by Anne Hunter will set the mood as your day comes to a close. Beautiful illustrations using watercolor and ink show frogs, foxes, otters and whales settling in for their evening. The calming text intertwines animal sounds with poetic prose, perfect for reading aloud to a toddler or preschooler. “The frogs puff their throats full of cool air from the woods, where the poorwill calls poorwill! poorwill! and listens for the footfall of the fox.” The framework of the story connects one sleeping child at the beginning to another sleeping child at the end, with the land and ocean and all the animals between them. Another gorgeous title to share is Kevin Henkes When Spring Comes, with enticing illustrations by Laura Dronzek. Young children are amazed by the green and the blossoms and the critters that come with springtime. Henkes captures this wonder and the joy it brings.

moMo Jackson is the star of a beginning reader series by David Adler, who also writes Cam Jansen mysteries, picture book biographies and a slew of other series. In Get a Hit, Mo!, Mo’s baseball team, the Lions, is playing the Bears. Mo was excited about the game, but after he arrives, he remembers that he is the smallest on his team. He always bats last and is stationed in boring right field. The Bears, on the other hand, look big and strong and they pitch fast. Mo strikes out, not once but twice. Many kids will identify with Mo’s moods and will cheer him on to the very end. Adler, a seasoned writer of beginning readers, has the formula down perfectly with just the right amount of text, controlled vocabulary, and illustrations by Sam Ricks that will clue readers in to the story as they decipher harder words.

Headed out to the park with your “helicopter parent” shoes on? Check out some facts and advice from Heather Shumaker’s It’s OK to Go Up the Slide: Renegade Rules for Raising Confident and Creative Kids, a recent addition to our Parent and Teacher Resource Center. There’s a reason why your child wants to go up the slide. In fact, the urge to take risks or try new challenges is part of healthy development. Shumaker uses her Renegade Golden Rule, “It’s OK if it’s not hurting people or property,” to sort through many situations kids and parents encounter. She tackles topics parents may not have even considered questioning, like talking to strangers or doing homework, and includes a helpful section on limits for screen time. With each new chapter, or “rule,” Shumaker includes examples, facts about child development, and practical tools for parents to try. She provides words to say (and words to avoid), as well as how to “take off your adult lenses” to get past preconceived notions. Chapters can easily be read alone, so busy parents or teachers can read what they need instead of tackling a 300+ page book.

Enjoy the transformation of spring with your kids, and if the wind or rain drives you inside, curl up with a good library book.


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Spring Teen and Tween Events at the Library

by Rachael Schmidtlein, Teen and Tween Services Coordinator

For several years now, the Manhattan Public Library has had increasingly strong teen programs. Teens have the opportunity to be a part of the Teen Library Advisory Board (TLAB), which makes decisions that directly affect the teen space at the library, as well as what future programs the library will hold. We plan several programs a semester on days that local middle and high schools will be out of session in order to give teens something to do that’s fun and safe. The highlights of our teen programs are the Teen after Hours, which happen at least once a semester and last three and half hours. Each Teen after Hours is themed-based on what the TLAB chooses, and the library always provides the teens with dinner. This summer, we’ll ramp up our teen programs with a Super Smash Tournament, Minecraft Gaming, DIY Solar Powered S’mores Ovens and more.

Additionally, if you have a teen looking for volunteer opportunities this summer, we are now accepting applications for our teen summer volunteer program. The summer volunteers help us run programs and sign people up for summer reading prizes. The application can be found at our Children’s Desk or online under our job openings tab at I will begin reviewing applications in early May, and the volunteers will begin working in early June.

As the Manhattan community has grown, a demand for programs strictly for kids between 4th and 6th grades has emerged, and this year the Manhattan Public Library has decided to meet that demand. We’ve only been dipping our toes into tween programs for about a semester, and already we’ve had great success. This summer we’ll continue our foray into tween programming with clubs and specialized events, so keep an eye out for our 2016 summer reading information packets.

We’re really excited about all of the summer programs coming your way in just a few months, but we do have some spring programs to tide you over until then. Our spring teen and tween programs are listed below and don’t require registration unless otherwise noted.

Teen Events (Grades 7-12)

Fifth Wave after Hours

Saturday, April 9th

5:30 – 9:00 PM

Registration Required

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to run around the library when it’s closed? That’s exactly what the Teen after Hours is about. We’ll have fort wars, games and crafts based around Rick Yancey’s popular series, The 5th Wave. Dinner is included. Spots fill up quickly, so register ASAP at or call 785-776-4741.


May the 4th Be With You Party

Wednesday, May 4th

4:00 – 5:00 PM

Are you a Star Wars fan who loves to celebrate the most epic space saga ever? Well, then join us for door prizes, and Star Wars themed food and games! Appropriate costumes and other fan memorabilia are encouraged.

Tween Events (Grades 4-6)

 Land of Stories Party

Wednesday, April 6th

3:00 – 4:00 PM

Have you read Chris Colfer’s thrilling Land of Stories series? Come to the library to showcase your knowledge of fairy tales! Activities will include a fairy tale mash-up, series trivia, and we will even attempt to complete our very own wishing spell. You don’t want to miss this great party for tweens in grades 4-6!

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 Discover Your Passion

by Brian Ingalsbe, Youth Services Library Assistant

Spring break officially begins tomorrow, and most – if not all – of our children are ready for a FULL WEEK of relaxation. What will they do with that week? If they’re like me, they’ll spend the first few days splurging on all of their favorite activities and pastimes. But what then? Take them to Manhattan Public Library to discover their next great passion. How? Well, I have just the answer for you!

Have fun

During the week of spring break the Youth Services department is having several fantastic programs that both you and your child can enjoy. You can find information about any of these events in three ways: 1) visit our website at and click on the events tab, 2) grab a March monthly calendar at any of our service desks, or 3) ask any of our staff!

Take a book trip

If you think that you need to physically move to go on a journey, then you have never read a good book. Stories of all kinds can transport you to vast worlds – both imaginary and real. Half of the fun of reading is escaping your humdrum routine for something a bit more exhilarating. As a lover of fantasy fiction, I understand this as well as anyone. If this is the kind of read you love, here are a few great books for you.

Savvy by Ingrid Law – For generations, the Beaumont family has inherited a magical secret. Each family member is endowed with “Savvy”, a special ability on their thirteenth birthday. On the eve of Mibs’s birthday, her father is in a terrible accident. Determined to prove her magic can save him, she hitches a ride on an ordinary bus, which is headed in the wrong direction.

School for Good and Evil by Soman Chainani – Agatha and Sophie live in a world outside of the magical forest. Agatha is always glum and gloomy; Sophie is cheery and happy as can be. When these two unlikely friends are abducted to the School for Good and Evil they learn that appearances are not always what they seem.

If you don’t fancy fiction, nonfiction is another viable option. It is always fun to choose a geographic location and immerse yourself in a culture and way of life. Here are some great nonfiction series that accomplish this.

Scholastic’s Enchantment of the World – This series focuses on different countries around the world. This series is great because it addresses many of the different factors that makes each country unique – including its people, land features, religious practices, and even national pastimes! This series is broken up with numerous pictures, which makes it much less intimidating for children.

America the Beautiful This series – also published by Scholastic – focuses on the diversity of the each of our 50 states. Each book addresses the state’s basic information – such as history, government, and economy. I love this series because it utilizes fun fact trackers including graphs, FAQ’s, wow factors, and travel guides. You and your child will love learning about a new state with this fun and engaging series!

Learn a new skill

When you’ve had your fill of travel, you can come back to MPL and grab some amazing books to explore your next great hobby or pastime – or just satisfy your thirst to learn something new. When I think about exploring a new hobby, there are several activities and books that pop into my head!

Learn to Draw – This series is great for children who crave creativity. Each book in the series explores different ways to draw various subjects – including animals, transportation, and even your favorite Disney characters! These books not only teach you how to draw well, they also include mini quizzes and fun facts on every page. How cool is that?

Easy Menu Ethnic Cookbooks – This series of cookbooks features authentic and easy-to-replicate recipes from all over the world. Cooking is something fun that you can do with any of your loved ones, and what better way than to explore a new cuisine together?

No matter what their passions may be, MPL has something for your children! Our staff is always ready to help you find your next great read, explore the online world, or answer any question you may have. You can contact the Youth Services Department staff at or (785)776-4741 ext. 400.

Posted in: Children's Dept, For Kids, library services, Mercury Column, News

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