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Souper Bowl Soups are Needed

by Mary, Adult Services Librarian

sundayDo you have any extra cans of soup in your pantry to share?  This weekend is the almighty Super Bowl, and Bill Kennedy has been coordinating and promoting it as Souper Bowl Sunday for a number of years.  “Long after a day when most of us celebrate with food and drink and relaxation, hunger will remain…   From 9a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, January 31, volunteers will be collecting canned food at each of Manhattan’s grocery stores.  Also every church and organization in the area can likewise collect food for hungry people.”

We all can enjoy thinking about the warmth soup can bring to us in the winter. In fact February 4th is National Homemade Soup Day.

 

Why not try Grammy’s Broccoli Soup from the food.com website.

1 bunch broccoli, cut up

1/2 cup diced celery

1/2 cup diced carrot

1 quart water

2 -4 chicken bouillon cubes

3 tablespoons butter

1/2 cup chopped onion

1/4 cup cornstarch

1/4 cup flour

1 quart milk (2% or whole is best)

4 ounces shredded cheddar cheese

Directions:

1.Combine broccoli, celery, carrots, water, and chicken bouillon in a large soup pot. Boil 20-30 minutes.

2.While vegetables are cooking – In a saucepan, saute onion in butter until tender.

3.Add cornstarch and flour to butter mixture, stirring until browned.

4.Gradually add milk and cook, stirring constantly, until thick. Add shredded cheese and stir until melted.

5.Add the cheese sauce to the broccoli mixture and stir until well combined. Simmer until heated through.

Try a new soup from one of our many cookbooks that focus on hearty goodness in a bowl.

300 soups300 Sensational Soups by Carla Snyder

Sunday Soup: A Year’s Worth of Mouthwatering Easy to Make Recipes by Betty Rosbottom

Soup Night: Recipes for Creating Community Around a Pot of Soup by Maggie Stuckey

 

Posted in: Adult Services, For Adults

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Reading Round-Up on Tuesday Afternoons

Ms. Amber leads the Reading Round-Up Storytime on Tuesday afternoons at 1:30.  This storytime focuses on older preschoolers (ages 4 & up), and incorporates some games and activities to encourage letter recognition, phonemic awareness, rhyming and other early literacy skills. Amber uses interactive stories where children can help by repeating phrases, acting out parts of the story, or helping with puppets, props or flannel board pieces.

Reading Round-up letter C

Children use their arms and bodies to make a letter C during storytime.

Parents can find more ideas for encouraging early literacy skills at the State Library of Kansas’s “6 By 6” website.

Posted in: Children's Dept, For Kids, Parents

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Lynda.Com: Helping You Learn in the New Year

by Heather Strafuss, Assistant Circulation Manager

Lynda.com is now a resource you can use with your library card, and they have lots of fantastic tutorials on how to help improve certain skills in your life.

As part of the library’s social media team, I decided to try out Lynda.com’s expertise and up my photography game. My previous experience with photography has been minimal. I love how new cameras can make taking a nice picture relatively easy but feel I could learn more to make them really pop and stand out.

To get started, I chose a “Photography 101” course. The classes are broken down into a variety of five to eight minute sessions so that you can pause and start again easily if you’re not able to watch the whole tutorial. Before getting started I snapped this picture of the MPL sign so I can compare all I’ve learned against it:

mpl1

The tutorial starts with a man informing me that this is a class for anyone who’s never taken a DSL camera out of automatic mode.*hangs head* Yup, that’s totally me! Let’s hope I learn something helpful.

Next the instructor goes over how to hold the camera. At first my thoughts were, Oh, come on, we all know how to hold a camera, but quickly turned into…Ooh wait. Oh jeez. I’ve been holding it wrong this whole time. In what’s known as a “tourist” hold? Oh, dear. I don’t wanna be known as a tourist! Luckily, the instructor provides several suggestions on how to hold and carry the camera so I no longer look like a tourist.

Excellent!

Shortly after is a brief explanation on how to hold the camera steady. This is helpful, as the camera is a little bulky and I don’t want to look like an amateur again.

Next we go over all the little dials on the camera. Ha! Knew those were important. The instructor explains aperture mode and how a large aperture and a shallow depth of field can create a great shot. I grimace, still not entirely sure what that means. But after several example shots showing how changing the aperture can change a picture, I think I’ve got it. We then go over shutter speed: the time for which a shutter is open at a given setting, changing ISO: which is adjusting your camera’s sensitivity to light, and the exposure compensation dial: a way to correct improper exposure. The instructor is calm and explains things well, and I find myself following him without a problem.

Fabulous! I shall soon be a pro, and will have gorgeous pictures forever more.

We continue to learn additional procedures for fantastic shots. I learn that dropping down into a crouch is an easy way to change perspective, and a small tilt or rotate of the camera can a big difference.

We wrap up with a “Buying New Gear” section which is very tempting to this librarian to go out and get more fun gear. With that, I’ve finished my course and am ready to be a solid photographer! Here is my after shot using all the tricks I learned using Lynda.com:

mpl 2

Not too shabby! I will definitely be checking out the rest of the videos, and you should too! Make sure you have your library card and know your PIN, and you will be good to go! Call the library at 785-776-4741 for further details!

Posted in: Adult Services, For Adults, News

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Tax Time!

taxIt’s nearing the end of January and it’s that time of year–time to think about filing taxes. The IRS is publishing fewer instruction booklets and forms this year, so many items will need to be found online at www.irs.gov.  The Riley County Extension Office is providing free tax preparation services here at Manhattan Public Library, in our Tech Center. They are able to prepare simple IRS 1040 and Kansas forms only–no military, out-of-state or International student forms. The maximum household income is $52,000 to use this free service. You must have an appointment–call 565-6426 or email vitataxes@gmail.com to schedule a time.

Posted in: Adult Services

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Martin Luther King, Jr. 2015 Art and Writing Contest

by Keri Mills, Young Adult Librarian

MLK

Manhattan Public Library (MPL) hosted and sponsored the 2015 Martin Luther King, Jr. Art and Writing Contest, which has been an important part of MLK Day events for over 15 years. The theme for this year’s contest was “Only Love Can Drive Out Hate,” which was taken from one of Dr. King’s most famous quotes: “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” This year’s entries acknowledged the importance that each individual can play, no matter how young or old he or she may be, in promoting Dr. King’s message of nonviolence. They also understand the importance of Dr. King’s place in the world that still resonates throughout our society today. There was participation from kids of all ages, as well as adults in this year’s contest. We had entries from almost all of the area elementary schools, Eisenhower and Anthony middle schools, Manhattan High School, Manhattan Catholic Schools, Flint Hills Christian School, Riley County schools, Kansas State University, and homeschool students.

Submissions for the contest were accepted beginning in December through January 11th, with the judging taking place on January 12th. All entries were judged based on five criteria: originality, creativity, artistic quality or writing style, content, and relevance to the theme. Winners were chosen by a panel of volunteer judges from the community. A thanks goes out to this year’s judges for volunteering their time and effort! Writing Judges included: Beth Bailey from the Union Program Council at Kansas State University; Carol Russell, English Professor at Kansas State University; and Deborah Murray, English professor at Kansas State University. Art judges included: Marrin Robinson, art instructor at Kansas State University; and Karen Schmidt, retired USD 383 middle school art teacher.

Besides Manhattan Public Library, this year’s sponsors included the Gallery for Peace and Justice, Manhattan Library Association, and Manhattan Town Center. Best of show winners received $50 gift certificates from Varney’s or Claflin Books and Copies and $20 gift cards from Manhattan Town Center. First place winners from each of the five age categories received a $25 gift certificate from Varney’s or Claflin Books and Copies. All winners received a certificate of recognition from the MLK Art & Writing Contest Committee.

Award winners were recognized at the annual awards ceremony which took place during the community MLK celebration at Manhattan Town Center on Monday, January 19. Manhattan Mayor Wynn Butler presented the winners with their awards at the recognition ceremony. Here are the 2015 contest winners:

ART

Best of Show: Usha Reddi’s first grade class from Ogden Elementary

 First Place

K-2nd Grade: Ritodeep Roy, Lee Elementary

3rd-5th Grade: Micah Craine, Bluemont Elementary

6th-8th Grade: Kaden Vandorn, Flint Hills Christian School

Adult:  Paulicia Williams

 Honorable Mention

K-2nd Grade: Justin Orvis, Manhattan Catholic Schools

3rd-5th Grade: Sahana Datta and Ananya Pagadala, Marlatt and Amanda Arnold Elementary Schools

6th-8th Grade: Ann Hess, Flint Hills Christian School

9th-12th Grade: Ames Burton, Riley County Schools

 WRITING

Best of Show: Chase Rauch, Manhattan Catholic Schools

First Place

3rd-5th Grade: Halle Gaul, Frank V. Bergman Elementary

6th-8th Grade: Blaise Hayden, Manhattan Catholic Schools

9th-12th Grade: Elijah Irving,  Flint Hills Christian School

Adult: Randy Jellison

 Honorable Mention

3rd-5th Grade: Hannah Loub, Frank V. Bergman Elementary

6th-8th Grade: Abby Cronander, Manhattan Catholic Schools

9th-12th Grade: Amanda Dillon, Flint Hills Christian School

9th-12th Grade: Caleb Linville, Flint Hills Christian School

 

Congratulations to all of our winners, and thank you to all of the individuals and groups who participated in the contest. The winning entries will be on display at MPL in the atrium through the end of February. Be sure to stop by and take a look!

Posted in: Mercury Column, News

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Zoofari

Join us this month AT Manhattan Public Library for our first Zoofari Tails Storytime, featuring the theme Snowy Cats! Help us break in our new storytime room by prowling in the snow, making animal noises, and even seeing some great animal biofacts – provided by docents at the Sunset Zoo. Stories read will include Little Mist and BobcatsBaby Snow Leopard. Children who attend will be given a new 2015 Zoofari puncard – after attending 6 sessions you will be eligible for a year-long membership to the zoo! Children will also be entered to win a free book! Don’t miss this fun and lively storytime! Please note that storytimewill be held at the public library and will begin at 10:00 – lasting about 30 minutes. We hope to see you there!

Posted in: Children's Dept, For Kids, library services, Parents

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Great Start to the Year in Children’s Dept.

Thank you to the community for celebrating our Children’s Room Grand Opening with us on Saturday, January 17th! It was a fun-filled afternoon of music, activities, costumed characters, balloons, cookies and more!  Special thank goes out to Sunset Zoo for bringing several live animals kids could see and touch. Also to the Junior League of the Flint Hills and the local Girl Scouts who volunteered all afternoon.  We initiated the new Storytime Room this morning with more than 80 people at our first Toddler Move & Groove Storytime session in our finished room.  It’s going to be a great year!crowd

IMG_5727IMG_5799IMG_5739IMG_5712olivia hugrockin robballoons in roomoutside doorchalk girl]gear walltunnelready

Posted in: Children's Dept, For Kids, News, Parents

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Winter Book Series Tackles British Classics

by Susan Withee, Adult Services Manager

emmaWith the holiday season behind us and 2015 ahead, Manhattan Public Library is happy to resume monthly readers’ events for adults and will again host our annual winter series of TALK book discussion programs. The TALK series, “Talk About Literature in Kansas,” is a service of the Kansas Humanities Council and is sponsored at MPL again this year by the Manhattan Library Association. Avid readers will meet on the last Thursday of each month from January through April at 7:00 p.m. in the Library’s Groesbeck Room and will explore a different book each month, guided by knowledgeable and insightful discussion leaders from the KHC. Please join us for any one, all four, or as many of the discussions as your schedule will allow.

This year’s ambitious theme is British Literary Classics of the 19th Century, and our selections are “Emma” by Jane Austen, “Far from the Madding Crowd” by Thomas Hardy, “Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens, and “The Mill on the Floss” by George Eliot. These authors represent the great age of British novelists and our four novels are among the best of the era. They were written as the Industrial Revolution began to transform England forever and usher in the upheaval, uncertainty, and excitement of the modern age. Copies of the featured books are available for checkout at the Library’s Information Desk and available in free down-loadable e-book format from Project Gutenberg. And for reluctant readers, or those of you in a time crunch, the good news is that all four of our selections are also available from the library in DVD format!

madding
First up, on Thursday, January 29, is “Emma,” Jane Austen’s beloved comedy of manners. Lovely, privileged, and headstrong Emma Woodhouse is the doyenne of her small county society. She takes a keen interest in the affairs of her neighbors and enlivens her quiet, uneventful life with efforts at match-making. The characters in Emma’s circle are drawn with good-natured humor, the plot entertains, and the dialogue sparkles. In the end, Emma finds out the hard way that people don’t fall in love according to plan, but the outcome is happier than even she could have planned.

In “Far from the Madding Crowd,” February’s book selection, beautiful, willful, and independent Bathsheba Everdene attracts the passionate attentions of three very different suitors in a 19th century English village. Like her biblical namesake, the choices she unwittingly makes cause catastrophe for the men who love her and particular heartbreak for Gabriel Oak, a man of stalwart courage and integrity.  Set against a backdrop of the lush English countryside and the rhythms of rural life, this is an absorbing, beautifully descriptive, character-driven masterpiece.

greatFor March 26th, we’ll read Charles Dickens’ “Great Expectations,” the story of orphaned Pip, his desperate early years, his struggles to overcome his past, and his dreams of becoming a gentleman.  Drawing on Dickens’ frequent themes of Victorian wealth and poverty, love and rejection, weakness or strength of character, and the eventual triumph of good over evil, the novel weaves multiple storylines into a tight plot, imagines scenes rich in comedy and pathos, and introduces a succession of unforgettable characters.

We’ll finish up on Thursday, April 30, with “The Mill on the Floss” by George Eliot.  The most autobiographical of all Eliot’s novels, this is a tale of English rural life, rival families, and sibling relationships.  As a child, Maggie Tulliver is independent and intellectually curious, but her thirst for knowledge and desire for meaningful relationships is eclipsed by family financial calamity and thwarted by her conventional rural community.  As she grows to womanhood, tensions with her family and community increase, and the novel explores the conflicts of love and loyalty and between desire and responsibility.

millPlease join us to discuss the first book in this winter series, Jane Austen’s “Emma,” on Thursday, January 29th, at 7:00 p.m. in the library’s Groesbeck Room.

 

 

 

 

Posted in: Adult Services, For Adults, library services, Mercury Column, News

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Eagle Day at Milford Lake

untitledTomorrow,  January 17, 2015, head to Milford Lake State Park for their annual celebration of Eagle Days. View live eagles and see various programs on raptors of Kansas at the Milford Nature Center. Take a guided bus tour and view the Bald Eagles as they soar above Milford Lake or watch them as they sit in the tall cottonwood trees along the lake’s shore. Learn about nesting eagles in Kansas and watch the Live Eagle program. Bus tours for viewing will begin at 9:30 a.m. with the last tour at 3:30 p.m., departing from the Milford Nature Center parking lot. It’s all free! We are lucky to live in an area where these magnificent birds spend the winter and where we can get great views of them soaring above the Flint Hills, so take advantage of this great opportunity to learn more about our national bird! Check Facebook for more information!

eagle days

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