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October is National Reading Group month!

by Rhonna, Adult Services

Hopefully you’ve noticed that we have some options for gathering to talk about books here at the library  but even if you prefer to create your own book group, we’re here to help you out.
Two databases are available to help you. Novelist Plus is the go-to tool for exploring all information about books, including helpful discussion guides for some titles. BookBrowse also offers discussion questions, but goes beyond that to provide advice for starting and running a book group, book recommendations, and author interviews. Both resources are available from the library Research Page .
readingIt can be difficult to get enough books for your entire group to read. Fortunately, some libraries in Kansas have created book group kits, including several books and often a discussion guide. The Kansas Library has provided a list of all of the sets available in the state. If you find something that works for you, contact our Interlibrary Loan department at 785-776-4741 ext. 139.
We also have some books that might be helpful for you: Read It and Eat: A Month-By-Month Guide to Scintillating Book Club Selections and Mouthwatering Menus by Sarah Gardner, Reading Group Choices: Selections for Lively Book Discussions, and Book Lust: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment, and Reason.

Posted in: Adult Services, For Adults

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Friends of the Library

MLA Board meeting spring 2014Did you know…theManhattan Library Association has a long history in our community?

A group of pioneer men formed the Manhattan Literary Institute in 1856 to “encourage industry, promote virtue, and mutually assist each other in the acquisition of knowledge.” While the purpose of this institute was to conduct “literary exercises” among its male members, its single greatest contribution was the purchase of a lot at 5th and Poyntz to be dedicated to the construction of a library.

Then in 1900, a group of concerned women saw the need to further promote this aim and organized the Manhattan Library Association. Their goal was “the erection of a building for library, reading room and other purposes.” Not only did the original sixteen women target a membership of 200 with an enrollment fee of $5.00, they also took the initiative to pursue a donation from Andrew Carnegie to build the library.

Through the leadership of Elizabeth Purcell, president of the Manhattan Library Association, this goal was reached in January 1903 when a $10,000 gift from Mr. Carnegie was confirmed. Construction began on the Carnegie Public Library in February, and the building was completed in time for a December opening.

Fast forward to 2014. The Manhattan Library Association, the Friends of the Library, is alive and well. Our strength today can be attributed to all of you, our dedicated members, who share a kindred spirit with the founders of the Manhattan Literary Institute and the original MLA. Our goals are similar: encourage gifts to the Manhattan Public Library; enrich the resources and facilities of the library; build support in the community for expansion of the facility and its programming; and undertake specific projects as determined by the library director.

Through the support of MLA members and the direction of the MLA board and library director, Linda Knupp, we have made great strides in contributing to these goals. Our annual book sale, as well as the sale of books at Rosie’s Corner Book Store in the library, allow the association to fund numerous programs that serve a broad range of patrons. With the aim of fostering literacy in our youngest citizens, MLA donations fund Kansas Reads to Preschoolers, providing free books to youngsters. Jennifer Adams, Children’s Services Manager, appreciates the financial support for all of the story time supplies, interactive toys, early literacy activities, and special events for school-aged children and families.

We are all eager to enjoy the new spaces and explore the neighborhoods as the children’s expansion project nears completion. The library and MLA will be throwing a party on January 17, 2015 to celebrate this accomplishment!

The Manhattan Library Association is also pleased to contribute to adult and young adult services for library patrons. Summer reading programs are not just for children! Summer reading for adults is one of the many programs mentioned by Susan Withee, the Adult Services Manager, that receives financial support from MLA. Throughout the year, the library provides several opportunities to be involved in adult reading groups. The newly formed Good Books Club meets monthly through the fall, and the TALK program occurs on the 4th Thursdays from January to April. In addition, MLA covers our library’s participation fee for the Big Read sponsored by the Kansas Humanities Council. Look for enrollment in this program coming up in November, and enjoy reading The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien.

Young adults are important and active patrons at MPL. With guidance from Keri Mills, Young Adult Librarian, an advisory group for teens, TLAB (Teen Library Advisory Board), recommends and supports programming for this demographic. MLA supports their projects, purchases books and gift cards for summer reading program rewards, and provides T-shirts for teen volunteers.

As you can see, the advocacy of our Manhattan Library Association members plays a significant role in supporting a broad range of programming for patrons of all ages. Thank you for your dedicated support. Please use the insert in this newsletter to renew your MLA membership. Just think: this is one way you can beat inflation…membership was $5.00 in 1900 and only $10.00 now! Encourage your friends to become Friends of the Library as well!

Working together for literacy,
Elaine Shannon
MLA President

Posted in: For Adults, For Kids, For Teens, News

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The Season for Bicycling

Complete Bike by Chris SidwellsI love biking all year around, but it is especially wonderful in the fall. The cool air, the crunch of leaves under the tires, and the perfect speed for viewing the scenery all add up to an exceptional transportation experience. Manhattan has been named a “Bicycle Friendly Community” by the League of American Bicyclists but we’re not resting on our laurels. Improvements are continuously being made to make biking in Manhattan safer, easier, and more enjoyable. Check out the city’s website to find Manhattan’s Bike Everywhere map, bicycle safety rules, and the latest happenings of the Bicycle Advisory committee. If you want to venture beyond the bounds of our fair city, you might want to check out the Kansas Bicycle Guide from the Kansas Department of Transportation. They have some helpful information and a great bicycle map for the state.

Biking is a great way to get around town, but it can also be a fun social activity. Flint Hills Area Bike Club plans bike-related gatherings and provides an online place to socialize with fellow bike lovers. Two local bike shops, The Pathfinder and Big Poppi Bicycle Company, organize group rides. You can also learn more about repairing and maintaining your bike at UFM.

Of course we also have resources at the library for everything from learning the basics to inspiration:

 

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Celebrating All Things Pasta

by John Pecoraro,  Assistant Director

Nothing says Italy like pasta. Some historians believe that Marco Polo introduced noodles to Italy after his journeys to China. There is evidence, however, that the Romans used durum wheat to make a pasta-like noodle called “lagane.” By the 1300’s, dried pasta had gained popularity for its nutrition and long shelf life, but it wasn’t until the nineteenth century that pasta met the tomato. The rest, as they say, is history.

October 25 was World Pasta Day, but it’s not too late to cook up a plate of this versatile food. Check out one of the many pasta cookbooks available at Manhattan Public Library.

The perfect shape plus the perfect sauce equals “The Geometry of Pasta,” by Caz Hildebrand and Jacob Kenedy. This book features 100 recipes arranged by the name and shape of the pasta, from agnolotti to ziti. In between, you’ll find recipes for cappelletti (little hats), orecchiette (little ears), torchio (torch-shaped), and many more.

giadaIn “Everyday Pasta,” bestselling author and cooking show host, Giada de Laurentiis, presents her favorite pasta recipes for every occasion. Giada makes the most of the many varieties of pasta with recipes for those looking for a lighter dish, as well as quick and easy fixes for the weeknight rush. She also features pastas for special occasions. Most of the pasta dishes included are all-in-one meals, but Giada also supplies recipes for her favorite appetizers, side dishes, and salads.

Want to cook pasta like they cook it in Italy? Look no further than “Sauces & Shapes: Pasta the Italian Way,” by Oretta Zanini de Vita and Maureen B. Fant. This book continues and complements Zanini de Vita’s “Encyclopedia of Pasta.” The authors first introduce readers to ingredients and equipment before delving into recipes for both novice and experienced cooks.

Rushed for time? Check out Giuliano Hazan’s “Thirty Minute Pasta,” for 100 quick and easy recipes. Aspiring cooks can make most of the recipes featured in under 30 minutes, with fewer than 10 ingredients. This book includes recipes for pasta soups, vegetarian dishes, as well as meat and seafood sauces. It also provides hints on stocking your pasta pantry, and the five simple rules for perfectly cooked pasta.

artisanSupermarket shelves are stocked with a dizzying selection of pastas to choose from, but for some it’s not pasta unless it’s homemade. “Making Artisan Pasta,” by Aliza Green, introduces the adventurous cook to the world of handmade linguine, ravioli, lasagna, and other styles of pasta from Italy. Green also includes instructions on making dozens of other pastas from around the world.

If I had to choose one variety of pasta over all others, it would have to be lasagna. “The New Lasagna Cookbook,” by Maria Bruscino Sanchez offers a crowd-pleasing collection of lasagna dishes from around the world. Tips on ingredients and equipment, and easy-to-follow recipes make this book perfect for beginning lasagna cooks, while the wide variety of classic and new recipes will challenge the experienced.

What’s pasta without the sauce? To avoid the embarrassment of naked pasta, read Pamela Johns’s “50 Great Pasta Sauces.” The rich photographs of pasta smothered or gently caressed by beautiful sauces will make your mouth water. Johns divides her sauce recipes by vegetable (classic tomato), dairy (browned butter & sage), meat (Bolognese), and seafood (pepper & anchovy).

macMacaroni and cheese is the most popular pasta dish in America. It would be a shame to only equate mac and cheese with the packaged varieties from the supermarket. In “Mac & Cheese,” Ellen Brown offers 80 classic and creative variations of the ultimate comfort food. Mascarpone lobster mac and cheese, anyone?

Finally, there are some among us who love the pasta, but don’t love the gluten. “Gluten-free Pasta,” by Robin Asbell presents more than 100 gluten-free and low and no-carb pasta recipes. The recipes fall into three categories: homemade pastas, store-bought brands, and veggie pastas. Store brands include white and brown rice, buckwheat, quinoa, potato, and corn pastas. Veggie alternatives include pastas made from spaghetti squash, sweet potatoes, parsnips, carrots, zucchini, collards, and cabbage.

You can call it pasta, you can call it macaroni, or you can call it noodles, but whatever you call it, the result is usually delicious. Enjoy a dish today.

Posted in: For Adults, Mercury Column, News

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Women, the Vote and a Book Discussion!

by Mary, Adult Services

index06OGXZN8It’s a privilege to vote!  Did you know that not until 1971 were women allowed to vote in Switzerland? Other countries that were late adopters include France in 1944, Italy in 1946, and Greece in 1952.

Women’s suffrage- the right of women to vote and to stand for electoral office has a colorful history throughout the world and especially in the United States.  Diane Eickhoff has authored a fascinating book called Revolutionary Heart: The Life of Clarina Nichols and the Pioneering Crusade for Women’s Rights.  This crusader lived in Kansas during the wild frontier times of “Bleeding Kansas” where she spoke for the freedom of slaves as well as women’s rights. Due to her efforts and others like her, Kansas women gained the vote in 1912, eight years before Congress passed the 19th Amendment granting voting rights to all American women.

Contact the library to request a copy of this historical page-turner and put Thursday, October 30th on your calendar.  Join us as we hear the author present the story of Clarina Nichols, an example of our amazing Kansas forerunners that worked for the privileges we now take for granted.

7:00 pm in the Groesbeck room, second floor. Refreshments served.

 

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What’s Happening, Manhattan?

by Alphild Dick, Adult Services Librarian

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Homecoming and pumpkins and trick-or-treaters, oh my! Fall is officially here, and with it, all the exciting seasonal activities. Homecoming and Halloween are center stage both this weekend and next week, so make sure to clear out some space on your calendar for these annual traditions.

  • October 19-25: K-State Homecoming Week
    • October 24 at 5pm: Homecoming Parade and Pep Rally. Starting at Manhattan Town Center and ending at City Park, the homecoming parade will feature former Wildcat football players and brothers, Kevin Lockett and Aaron Lockett, as the grand marshals. Following the parade, there will be a pep rally at 6:30pm at the Larry Norvell Band Shell featuring the KSU Pep Band, cheerleaders, Classy Cats and Willie…plus appearances by football coach, Bill Snyder, and women’s basketball coach, Jeff Mittie.
    • October 25 at 11am: K-State vs. Texas Homecoming Football Game
  • October 24, 3PM-7:30pm: Trick-Or-Treat Aggieville. Aggieville gets spooky starting at 3pm for its annual, family-friendly Halloween celebration. Bring the kids for trick-or-treating at Aggieville businesses, but stay for the The Dusty Bookshelf’s haunted house, the free mini-donuts at Varsity Donuts, and the Halloween photo booth. Bonus: Get there early and snag a prime spot for watching the K-State Homecoming Parade.
  • October 25, 8am-1pm: Happy HalloBirthday! Downtown Farmers Market is hosting its 35th birthday party AND a Halloween party this Saturday. Come in costume, trick-or-treat at vendor stalls, and enter the pumpkin decorating contest. Pumpkins must be turned in at the market by 10am.
  • October 31: Halloween! Whether you are in it for the costumes, the candy, or just the general festiveness of the holiday, there are lots of great spots in the Manhattan community to visit on Halloween.
    • All Treats Day from 4-6pm in downtown Manhattan. Make sure to stop by Manhattan Public Library for a special treat!
    • Bewitching in Westloop from 4-6pm
    • Boo Party at Manhattan Town Center from 5:30-7:30 pm

Please make sure to stay safe as you enjoy the community activities. The City of Manhattan offers a number of valuable safety tips for making sure costumes, treats, and decorations are safe, and ensuring a fun time for everyone.

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October is “National Stop Bullying” Month.

by Linda, Adult Services

The self-esteem and empathy-building international non-profit organization “Hey U.G.L.Y.” (Unique gifted Lovable You) has designated October as a time for schools across America to conduct Stop Bullying classroom activities on how to eradicate bullying from classrooms and neighborhoods. Contact Hey U.G.L.Y. at preventbullyingnow@heyugly.org.

bullyManhattan Public Library has books dealing with bullying aimed at dealing with different age groups and books for parents as well. See Bullying by Lori Hile, and Dear Bully : Seventy Authors Tell Their Stories for young adults. For parents, seek Sexual Harassment and Bullying by Susan Strauss; Bully: an Action Plan for Teachers and Parents to Combat the Bullying Crisis; Bullied: What Every Parent, Teacher and Kid Needs to Know… by Carrie Goldman; and Sticks and Stones by Emily Bazelon. A documentary on DVD: Bully, is intense, and disturbing, some strong language and all involving kids.

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Zoofari Tails Storytime AT THE ZOO

Join us at 11:00 for tOwlhis month’s Zoofari Tails Storytime! This month’s theme is all about – wait for it – Owls! Stories read will include “Little Owl Lost”, “Owl Babies”, and “I’m Not Scared”. Children’s staff will also present engaging rhymes and songs all about owls! Zoo docents will give information about owls, and even show children a LIVE screech owl! Any child who comes will have a chance to win a free book, courtesy of Clafflin Books. Children and adults who attend will also receive free admission to the Sunset Zoo! If you have a Zoofari Punch Card, don’t forget to bring it because we only have a few months left before our annual drawing – children who have 6 punches on their card will be entered to win a free year-long membership to the Sunset Zoo. Come ready to screech, squawk, and flap your wings at this mega-fun storytime! Please note that storytime will be held in the rotunda building at the Sunset Zoo. All attendees are more than welcome to wear a Halloween costume too! WHOOOOOO will be there?

Posted in: Children's Dept, For Kids, Parents

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Do you have a Revolutionary Heart?

Women suffragists in Ohio

If you approached the polls this November and were blocked at the door, what would you do? If you were insulted, ridiculed, told you were less than a person and not intelligent enough to participate, would you give up and go home or would you stand up and demand to be heard?

On October 30 at 7:00 p.m. you will get a chance to discuss these questions and many more with author and independent historian Diane Eickhoff at the Manhattan Public Library’s Good Books Club meeting.

Eickhoff will lead a discussion sponsored by the Kansas Humanities Council entitled “Women Rising: How Kansas Women Gained the Vote, 1859-1912.” The discussion is based on research Eickhoff did when writing her book Revolutionary Heart:  The Life of Clarina Nichols and the Pioneering Crusade for Women’s Rights.

Revolutionary Heart is the featured read for the October Good Books Club, and was named a Kansas Notable Book in 2007. This gripping and poignant work tells the story of a 19th century pioneer who was a passionate and tireless advocate for women’s rights and the abolitionist movement in Kansas.

Stop by the library to request a copy of Revolutionary Heart, or purchase a copy at the discussion. Participants in this Good Books Club event will get the chance to connect with other book lovers, explore local history, visit with the author, and get their books signed!

The Good Books Club is organized and facilitated by staff at the Manhattan Public Library. The club is free and open to the public. Meetings are held once a month to discuss intriguing books, enjoy delightful conversation, and sample delicious treats and refreshments.

The Kansas Humanities Council conducts and supports community-based programs, serves as a financial resource through an active grant-making program, and encourages Kansans to engage in the civic and cultural life of their communities.  For more information about KHC programs contact the Kansas Humanities Council at 785/357-0359 or visit online at www.kansashumanities.org.

 

For more information about “Women Rising: How Kansas Women Gained the Vote, 1859-1912” or the Good Books Club, visit the Manhattan Public Library at 629 Poyntz Avenue, call (785) 776-4741. Find the library on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, and Instagram, too.

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Author Visit: Diane Eickhoff , author of “Clarina Nichols and the Pioneering Crusade for Women’s Rights”

by Susan Withee, Adult Services Manager

 

revolutionaryThis month’s meeting of the library’s new “Good Books” discussion series will welcome, in person, author Diane Eickhoff who will speak about her book “Revolutionary Heart: The Life of Clarina Nichols and the Pioneering Crusade for Women’s Rights.” This book is the biography of an extraordinary Kansas pioneer who was involved in the 19th century abolition and temperance movements, and who fought her own very personal fight for women’s legal rights to property, child custody, and the vote. Clarina Nichols was born and raised on a farm in Vermont, survived a troubled first marriage, and won a hard-fought court battle to retain custody of her children. She was successfully married a second time to a Vermont newspaper publisher and eventually took over the publishing of the newspaper. She became an eloquent journalist and passionate public speaker on the subjects of abolition and votes for women. Nichols joined the mid-century exodus of New England abolitionists to Kansas Territory to fight for free-state status and was an early resident of both Quindaro and Lawrence. She worked with and made speaking appearances with Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and other suffragist leaders, although her name is not as well known. This biography, well written and filled with great primary historical sources such as Clarina Nichols’ letters, speeches, and memoirs, introduces the reader to a regrettably little-known Kansas activist.

Please join us at the public library for the program and Good Books Discussion series on Thursday, October 30, at 7:00 p.m. in the Groesbeck Room.  This program is free and open to the public.

Posted in: Adult Services, For Adults, library services

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