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Do you have a Revolutionary Heart?

Women suffragists in Ohio

If you approached the polls this November and were blocked at the door, what would you do? If you were insulted, ridiculed, told you were less than a person and not intelligent enough to participate, would you simply go home or would you stand up and demand to be heard?

On October 30 at 7:00 p.m. you will get a chance to discuss these questions and many more with author and independent historian Diane Eickhoff at the Manhattan Public Library’s Good Books Club meeting.

Eickhoff will lead a discussion sponsored by the Kansas Humanities Council entitled “Women Rising: How Kansas Women Gained the Vote, 1859-1912.” The discussion is based on research Eickhoff did when writing her book Revolutionary Heart:  The Life of Clarina Nichols and the Pioneering Crusade for Women’s Rights.

Revolutionary Heart is the featured read for the October Good Books Club, and was named a Kansas Notable Book in 2007. This gripping and poignant work tells the story of a 19th century pioneer who was a passionate and tireless advocate for women’s rights and the abolitionist movement in Kansas.

Stop by the library to request a copy of Revolutionary Heart, or purchase a copy at the discussion. Participants in this Good Books Club event will get the chance to connect with other book lovers, explore local history, visit with the author, and get their books signed!

The Good Books Club is organized and facilitated by staff at the Manhattan Public Library. The club is free and open to the public. Meetings are held once a month to discuss intriguing books, enjoy delightful conversation, and sample delicious treats and refreshments.

The Kansas Humanities Council conducts and supports community-based programs, serves as a financial resource through an active grant-making program, and encourages Kansans to engage in the civic and cultural life of their communities.  For more information about KHC programs contact the Kansas Humanities Council at 785/357-0359 or visit online at www.kansashumanities.org.

 

For more information about “Women Rising: How Kansas Women Gained the Vote, 1859-1912” or the Good Books Club, visit the Manhattan Public Library at 629 Poyntz Avenue, call (785) 776-4741. Find the library on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, and Instagram, too.

Posted in: For Adults, For Teens, News

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Author Visit: Diane Eickhoff , author of “Clarina Nichols and the Pioneering Crusade for Women’s Rights”

by Susan Withee, Adult Services Manager

 

revolutionaryThis month’s meeting of the library’s new “Good Books” discussion series will welcome, in person, author Diane Eickhoff who will speak about her book “Revolutionary Heart: The Life of Clarina Nichols and the Pioneering Crusade for Women’s Rights.” This book is the biography of an extraordinary Kansas pioneer who was involved in the 19th century abolition and temperance movements, and who fought her own very personal fight for women’s legal rights to property, child custody, and the vote. Clarina Nichols was born and raised on a farm in Vermont, survived a troubled first marriage, and won a hard-fought court battle to retain custody of her children. She was successfully married a second time to a Vermont newspaper publisher and eventually took over the publishing of the newspaper. She became an eloquent journalist and passionate public speaker on the subjects of abolition and votes for women. Nichols joined the mid-century exodus of New England abolitionists to Kansas Territory to fight for free-state status and was an early resident of both Quindaro and Lawrence. She worked with and made speaking appearances with Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and other suffragist leaders, although her name is not as well known. This biography, well written and filled with great primary historical sources such as Clarina Nichols’ letters, speeches, and memoirs, introduces the reader to a regrettably little-known Kansas activist.

Please join us at the public library for the program and Good Books Discussion series on Thursday, October 30, at 7:00 p.m. in the Groesbeck Room.  This program is free and open to the public.

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Share Books to Introduce Fire Safety

By Jennifer Adams, Children’s Services Manager

MHKFDDuring National Fire Prevention Week, our local firefighters visited schools to talk to students about fire safety and prevention, show them some equipment they use and make sure they would never be afraid of a firefighter in uniform. Notes were sent home reminding families to practice with their kids so they know what to do if the smoke detector goes off. Reading books about firefighters and fire safety is a great way to start this discussion with young children and let them talk about their concerns.

The library has an excellent collection of children’s materials on this topic, thanks to the Manhattan Firefighters Union Local 2275. They have donated funds for the past three years to boost the library’s collection, so more kids and teachers can check out books and make sure everyone knows how to stay safe.
For some fun read-alouds to start off with a lighter approach, these picture books are sure to be a hit:

“I’m Brave” by McMullan is told from the point of view of a “good looking” fire engine. He goes through all his equipment, including the usual hoses and axes, as well as duckbill pliers and rabbit ear bolt cutters. Kids who love fire trucks will also enjoy  “Firefighters: Speeding, Spraying, Saving” by Hubbell.

The exciting illustrations in Dale’s “Dinosaur Rescue” make it a perfect book to share with preschoolers, and Scarry’s “A Day at the Fire Station” in Busytown will always be good for some giggles, too. “Fire Drill” is a short picture book by Jacobs that describes the scenario of fire drills in a school setting with simple text and pictures, making the actual event a little less scary.

fire safety 1Some children are fascinated by emergency vehicles, from police cars to fire engines. For facts and photos about fire trucks, check out “Fire Trucks and Rescue Vehicles” from the Mighty Machines series, or “Fire Trucks in Action” by Hanson. “Rescue Vehicles” by Gilpin includes cross-section illustrations to show what is inside fire engines, ambulances, police cars and more. These books are now housed in our “Transportation” neighborhood in the Children’s Room.

A number of books for children have a very direct educational approach, which is great for covering the basics of fire prevention and procedures in case of a fire. “Contain the Flame” by Donahue covers outdoor and campfire safety, and “Being Safe with Fire” by Kesselring provides safety tips in everyday living, as well as steps to make an escape plan. Learn more specifics about firefighters’ jobs in books like “Firefighters Help Us” by Murray or “A Day with Firefighters” by Shepherd.

Our newest additions to the collection this year are two kits that include multiple books plus activities that can all be checked out together. The tote bag story kit, “Firefighters,” is geared toward preschool and early elementary ages. It includes six fun picture books, such as “Miss Mingo and the Fire Drill,” two informational books, a DVD of “Elmo Visits the Firehouse” and a cool firefighter costume for dress-up play.

The discovery pack, “Fire and Rescue,” comes in a backpack and is for kids in grades 2-6. It includes informational books about firefighters, fire dogs, smoke jumpers, rescue vehicles and fire safety. A large maze game will challenge older kids to think about fire safety, as well as test their logic and problem-solving skills.

fire safety 2Special thanks goes out to our local firefighters for all they do to keep us safe, educate us, and provide this kind of support to the whole community.

Posted in: Children's Dept, Mercury Column, News, Parents

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Teens at the Library

by Amber Keck, Children’s Librarian

TLAB_edited

Teenagers in Manhattan and surrounding areas have many opportunities to be a part of Manhattan Public Library. Not only can teens have access to materials and activities, but they also have the chance to log community service hours and connect with other teens and adults in the community.  With their parents’ permission, teens may own their own library card and have access to any unrestricted materials, including comic books, video games, fiction and nonfiction books. Programming for teens include Yu-Gi-Oh dueling, After Hours parties, crafting afternoons, and much more. Any activity or program for teenagers is free, but they do sometimes require pre-registration because of high attendance.

Teens can be a part of the brainstorming and implementation of programming in the library, as well. Keri Mills, MPL’s Young Adult Librarian, hosts a meeting of the Teen Library Advisory Board (TLAB) every month. During this time, TLAB plans activities and programs, discusses the library’s young adult book collection, and keeps Keri up-to-date on topics of interest to teenagers in the community. These meetings are held on the fourth Thursday of the month from 3:30-4:30 pm.  The next TLAB meeting is scheduled for Thursday, October 23rd in the Friends’ Room. Anyone is welcome to attend these meetings.

Rebecca Price, a summer teen volunteer and consistent contributor to TLAB, likes that she gets to meet a lot of new people through the volunteer program and TLAB. As a lover of the library, being an active member of TLAB is important to her. Over the years, she has had the chance to plan a number of different programs and activities, but the Catching Fire After Hours was by far her favorite.

During the summer months, teenagers can also be a part of the teen volunteer program, in which they assist library staff in presenting programs and giving out prizes to summer reading participants. During the summer of 2014, teen volunteers logged in 520 hours! The children’s staff simply could not pull off the extensive programming and awesome summer reading incentives without the help of the teen volunteers. Spots for this program go fast, so be sure to start inquiring about it in the wintertime.

At Manhattan Public Library, teenagers have a space to share their ideas, connect with the resources they need, and make a positive impact on their community.

Posted in: For Adults, For Teens, News, Young Adult Dept

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National Food Bank Week

breadbasketby Judi, Adult Services Librarian

This time of year, we look towards the holidays and gathering with friends and family over holiday meals. We also need to remember those who are less fortunate at this time of year, and to recognize National Food Bank Week, a wonderful gesture would be to stop by our local Food Bank, the Flint Hills Breadbasket, to donate items to make the holiday celebrations happier for a local family. The Flint Hills Breadbasket’s mission is “ To minimize hunger and poverty through the distribution of available food and to nurture projects that will help alleviate hunger and poverty. Hunger is an oftentimes invisible tragedy. For twenty-nine years, the Flint Hills Breadbasket has been collecting and distributing donations and food to ensure that no one in the community goes hungry.” Help our local residents in need by donating today!

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Librar-atory

by Judi Nechols, Adult Services Librarian

Did you know that lightning strikes produce O3 which is ozone, and strengthen the ozone layer of the atmosphere?

Even if we don’t often think about the topic of chemistry outside of a school setting, the chemical interactions of the world affect everything, from our cars to our food, and even to our senses themselves.

“Everything you hear, see, smell, taste, and touch involves chemistry and chemicals (matter). And hearing, seeing, tasting, and touching all involve intricate series of chemical reactions and interactions in your body. With such an enormous range of topics, it is essential to know about chemistry at some level in order to understand the world around us.” (from the American Chemical Society)

To help Manhattanites gain a deeper understanding of chemistry and the world at large, each year the Kansas State University branch of the American Chemical Society donates a selection of chemistry-related books to Manhattan Public Library. The variety of books in the collection include study guides for the AP Chemistry exam, books with information about careers in chemistry, guides for science fair experiments using chemistry, and many more.

Library staff and patrons are most grateful for these generous donations from the KSU chemists. A display featuring some of the donated books can be found across from the Information Desk on the first floor of the library. Explore the world of chemistry with titles like The Periodic Table: a Visual Guide to the Elements, Chemistry Connections:  the Chemical Basis of Everyday Phenomena, and Non-Traditional Careers for Chemists.

National Chemistry Week begins October 18, so this is the perfect time to brush up on cool chemical facts to impress your friends and learn to say things like, “I could really use a glass of dihydrogen monoxide (H2O) right now.”

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Progress in the new space

Stop by and see the progress in the north addition to the Children’s Room!  Carpet is down in this area, and temporary shelving has been set up so we can move some books out of the current space for the rest of the carpeting.  The new area will be open to the public in a few weeks while renovations in the old room are finished up.  We can’t wait for kids to try out the window seat!

windows and carpet

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2014 Teens’ Top Ten

Keri Mills, Young Adult Librarian

The Teens’ Top Ten is a teens’ choice list sponsored by the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA). Each year, teens nominate their favorite books from the previous year. Nominations are posted in April, and teens ages twelve to eighteen can vote on their favorite titles. The winning books will be announced on October 20, so teens still have one more week to vote for their favorites at http://www.dogobooks.com/book_clubs/teens-top-reads. As usual, there are a wide cross-section of genres represented on the list, so if your teen is looking for something to read, this list is a good place to start. Many of the titles have crossover appeal to adults, as well. Here are a few of my picks from the list of nominees this year:siege

“Siege and Storm” by Leigh Bardugo
This is the last book of an excellent trilogy, so be sure to start with the first one, “Shadow and Bone,” or you will be lost. Alina and Mal, who have been best friends since childhood, are soldiers in the First Army of Ravka. Ravka is a harsh place, ravaged by war and currently split in two by the Shadow Fold. The Fold is a place of darkness and danger, where creature called volcra snatch and eat men who attempt to cross through to the other side.  While attempting to cross the fold, Mal is gravely injured and Alina manifests the rare ability to summon light in order to save Mal’s life. Alina is immediately taken to the royal court to be trained as a member of the Grisha, those who can wield magic, and swept up in the intrigue of the court. Those who enjoy fantasy or historical fiction (many elements of the story were based on Russian myth and culture) should give this one a try.

“Eleanor and Park” by Rainbow Rowell
I put off reading this book even after hearing all the buzz about it, thinking it was just another typical romance. However, this turned out to be one of those rare books that sticks with you, long after you are done reading it. The year is 1986, and Eleanor is the new girl in town. She is forced to walk the gauntlet of the school bus where she is exposed to taunting and bullying because she is overweight and dresses strangely. She ends up sitting next to Park, who is half-Korean and something of an outsider at school. This is definitely not love at first sight. For awhile the two completely ignore each other, but gradually throughout the course of the year, they begin bonding over comic books and music. Eventually, they fall in love, but there is likely no happily ever after to this story. Park gradually learns about Eleanor’s poverty and her volatile family situation, which finally explodes.steel

“Steelheart” by Brandon Sanderson
This is a fun, fast-paced superhero story that is the first in a projected series. In this story, superheroes are the villains. Twelve years ago when the Calamity came, Epics were created, giving random humans incredible powers (and of course weaknesses). These Epics began subjugating the rest of humanity and taking over different parts of the world. Ten years ago, David’s father was killed by one of the most powerful Epics, named Steelheart. Ever since, David has made it his life’s mission to study the Epics and find their weaknesses. His one goal is to avenge his father’s death and take down Steelheart.

“In the Shadow of Blackbirds” by Cat Winters
Mary Shelley Black, age 16, has been sent to live with her aunt in San Diego. Like many cities in 1918, it is not only dealing with World War II, but also the Spanish flu pandemic which is killing millions all over the world. Surrounded by loss many have turned to spiritualism in an attempt to speak with dead loved ones. Taking advantage of this is Julius, the older brother of Mary’s love Stephen, who claims he can capture ghosts in photographs. Soon after finding out that Stephen has died, Mary begins being visited by his tormented ghost, who talks about the blackbirds who tortured and killed him. Mary embarks on a quest to learn the truth about Stephen’s death.5th

5th Wave by Rick Yancey
There couldn’t be a teen list without some post apocalyptic fiction. This one is the best of the bunch. This time the earth has been decimated by an alien invasion through four separate waves: an electromagnetic pulse, tsunamis, the Red Death, and Silencers (humans who were implanted with alien intelligence as fetuses). One of the rare survivors, Cassie, armed with an M16 and her brother’s teddy bear, is trying to reunite with her brother while escaping Silencers and the 5th Wave.

Posted in: For Teens, Mercury Column, News

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Those are my relatives??!!

by Judi Nechols, Adult Services Librarian

charetingPopular here at Manhattan Public Library are our Genealogy Resources. We have many print resources—books such as Genealogy Online for Dummies, Charting your Family History:  Includes Legacy; Family Tree software version 2.0, on CD-ROM, for Microsoft Windows, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska Civil War Veterans; and A Genealogist’s Guide to Discovering your Female Ancestors: Special Strategies for Uncovering Hard-to-find Information about your Female Lineage. (more…)

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